Faint PRAISE: 13 Year Delay In Publication Of A Major Clinical Trial Sparks Criticism

13 years after first being presented the results of the PRAISE-2 trial finally have been published in JACC: Heart Failure. The trial itself is now largely irrelevant to current clinical practice, as the hypothesis it tested has long been abandoned, but the long delay in publication may serve to bring even more awareness to the issue of the delay or complete absence of publication of many clinical trials.

An accompanying editorial, by Marc Pfeffer and Hicham Skali, is highly critical of the delay:

Although standards for conduct and reporting of clinical trials have improved since 2000, the failure to fully vet the results of a clinical trial of human volunteers in a peer-reviewed journal was and remains unacceptable.

PRAISE-2 had its origins in the first PRAISE trial, which was first presented in 1995 and subsequently published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1996. In that trial there was no difference between amlodipine (Norvasc, Pfizer) and placebo in the rate of mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization in patients with heart failure. However, a prespecified subgroup analysis turned up the highly surprising result that heart failure patients with a nonischemic etiology who received amlodipine had a highly significant 46% reduction in the risk of death compared with placebo patients.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

Milton Packer

Milton Packer

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