Amarin Says It Will Complete Cardiovascular Outcomes Trial For Its Fish Oil Pill Reply

After nearly a year of uncertainty, Amarin  announced  its commitment to complete REDUCE-IT  (Reduction of Cardiovascular Events with EPA – Intervention Trial). The trial is designed to test the effects on cardiovascular outcomes of Vascepa, the company’s high EPA omega-3 prescription fish oil product, in people with moderately elevated triglyceride levels between 200-499 mg/dL.

Last year the company said it might discontinue support of the trial, which began in 2011, after the FDA turned down the company’s application for an expanded indication for Vascepa.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

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Cheaper Generic Statins Beat Brand-Name Statins in Adherence and Outcomes Reply

A large observational study finds that people who received a prescription for a generic statin were more likely to take their pills than people who received a prescription for a brand-name statin. This increased adherence appeared to lead to a small but significant improvement in outcomes.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

ACC And AHA Don’t Recommend Routine ECG Screening Of Young People Reply

In a new scientific statement the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology do not recommend the routine initial use of ECGs to screen young people for underlying congenital or genetic heart disease.

More aggressive screening for heart disease in young people is often advocated in response to pressure resulting from the rare but tragic cases of sudden death in young people. But a detailed examination of the evidence led the AHA/ACC group to conclude that routine initial ECG screening “in healthy people 12-25 years old without positive findings on the history and physical examination has not been shown to save lives.”

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

FDA Approves New Weight Loss Drug From Orexigen And Takeda Reply

The FDA announced today that it had approved Contrave, the long-awaited and much-disputed weight loss drug.  The drug is a combination of two drugs already approved for other indications: naltrexone hydrochloride, which is used to combat alcohol and opioid dependence, and bupropion, which is used to treat depression and seasonal affective disorder and as an aid to smoking cessation treatment. Contrave is manufactured by Orexigen and will be distributed by Takeda.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

FDA Advisory Panel Offers Cautious Support For Polypill Reply

The controversial polypill took one step closer to reaching the US market after receiving a mostly positive reception from the FDA’s Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee on Wednesday. The idea for the polypill– which in this case would be composed of aspirin, a statin, and one or more blood pressure drugs– has been kicking around for more than a decade and has attracted considerable doses of support as well as skepticism.

An all-star group of cardiology leaders– including Sir Nicholas Wald, Salim Yusuf, Suzanne Oparil, Sidney Smith, and Clyde Yancy– helped provide the spoonful of sugar that helped the committee swallow the polypill. The FDA also eased the way by limiting the discussion to the use of the polypill for secondary prevention in people who have already had a MI or a stroke.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Statins And Diabetes: A Clearer Picture Emerges Reply

In recent years, the medical community has become increasingly aware that taking statins can result in slightly higher glucose levels, and this can lead to a diagnosis of diabetes in a small but statistically significant number of people. But it has been unclear whether the diagnosis of diabetes in people taking statins also places them at increased risk for the microvascular complications linked to diabetes. Now, an observational study published in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology finds that among people newly diagnosed with diabetes, statin users are less likely than nonusers to develop most of these complications. (The beneficial effects of statins in reducing macrovascular complications — cardiovascular disease — in diabetics and others is well established in people at high risk for these events.) 

Danish researchers examined the rate of microvascular outcomes in more than 15,000 statin users who developed diabetes and 47,000 nonusers of statins who developed diabetes.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Beyond Kickbacks: More Questions About Unnecessary Cardiovascular Tests Reply

On the front page of the Wall Street Journal today is an important story about a fast-growing company accused of giving kickbacks to physicians who order the company’s tests measuring a wide variety of cardiovascular biomarker tests. But the article leaves one major question unasked: even if the company played fully by the rules, are most of the tests medically necessary?

In their story John Carreyrou and Tom McGinty write about a government investigation into Health Diagnostic Laboratory Inc. (HDL), which was started in 2008 and had $383 million in revenue last year. HDL sells tests that measure cardiovascular biomarkers and “bundles together up to 28 tests it performs on a vial of blood, receiving Medicare payments of $1,000 or more for some bundles.”

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Early Hint At Cardiovascular Outcomes With Sanofi’s and Regeneron’s Rapidly Advancing Cholesterol Drug Reply

Amid a slew of new data demonstrating yet again that PCSK9 inhibitors lower LDL cholesterol– drastically and in a wide variety of different patient populations– data from one trial offers the first suggestion that the drugs may in fact improve cardiovascular outcomes. But the analysis, the authors cautioned, is a post-hoc analysis of a trial neither designed nor powered to study outcomes, so should be considered preliminary and speculative at best.

Four phase 3 trials with the Sanofi and Regeneron PCSK9 inhibitor alirocumab (pronounced “allee rock you mab” by Chris Cannon at a news conference) were presented today at the European Society of Cardiology meeting in Barcelona.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Rise In Popularity Of E-Cigarettes Sparks Concerns And Recommendations Reply

The recent dramatic rise in popularity of e-cigarettes threatens to reverse hard-fought progress in the war against smoking, according to a new policy statement from the American Heart Association. “E-cigarettes have caused a major shift in the tobacco-control landscape,” said the lead author of the statement, Aruni Bhatnagar, chair of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Louisville.

But the AHA did not completely reject the use of e-cigarettes as an aid to stop smoking.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Why Guidelines Should Be Waged Like War 1

Here’s a modest proposal: we need fewer and shorter guidelines. In fact, I’d like to propose that guidelines, like war, should be waged only when there is absolute consensus and overwhelming evidence.

Anyone interested in the subject is aware that guidelines are in a complete mess.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 707

United Nations Security Council Resolution 707 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

FDA Grants New Indication For Apixaban Reply

The FDA today approved an expanded indication for  the oral anticoagulant apixaban (Eliquis, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer). Apixaban will now be indicated for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), and for the reduction in the risk of recurrent DVT and PE (collectively known as venous thromboembolism) after initial therapy.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

Increased Heart Risk Linked To Popular Antibiotic Reply

Acute use of the popular macrolide antibiotic clarithromycin has been linked to a small but significant increase in cardiac death. In a report in the BMJ, researchers in Denmark analyzed the effects over a 14-year period of the acute use of penicillin V, roxithromycin, and clarithromycin.

Earlier research raised concerns that marcrolide antibiotics in general, and erythromycin and azithromycin in particular, might prolong the QT interval and increase the risk for fatal arrhythmias.

In the new study, clarithromycin was associated with a significant increase in the rate of sudden cardiac death compared with the other two antibiotics…

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

An Old Study Fuels Debate Over Blood Pressure Guidelines Reply

In the last year new guidelines relating to cardiovascular disease have been the subject of intense criticism and debate. The status of the blood pressure guidelines has been particularly contentious, since several different groups have published contradictory guidelines, while several authors of the most prominent group, the Eighth Joint National Committee, published an impassioned dissent from their own published guideline. Many hypertension experts have taken aim at the change in therapeutic target for systolic blood pressure in patients age 60 or older, from 140 mm Hg to 150 mm Hg.

In an attempt to determine the optimal blood pressure for patients age 60 or older, Sripal Bangalore and colleagues performed a post-hoc analysis of 8,354 patients who participated in the INVEST trial, who were age 60 or older, and who had a baseline systolic blood pressure greater than 150 mm Hg…

Click here to read the full post on Forbes, including comments from Sripal Bangalore and Harlan Krumholz.

 

An Expert’s Perspective: Why Salt Is Not Like Tobacco And Why Guidelines Are Tricky Reply

At the center of this week’s renewed debate on salt was Salim Yusuf, the long influential and often controversial cardiology researcher and clinical trialist based at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. I spoke with Yusuf before the publication of the New England Journal of Medicine papers, which include his own two papers from the PURE study.

Yusuf was troubled by the tone of the salt debate. He’s no stranger to scientific controversies and intense disagreement, but “scientific criticism is one thing, personal attack is another,” he said. Because he has presented data that suggests that moderately high levels of sodium may not be as bad as some had thought, and that very low levels of sodium may actually be harmful, “we’ve come under huge attack.”

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

New Studies Fuel The Debate Over Sodium Reply

Three papers and an editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine are sure to throw fresh fuel on the ongoing fiery debate over sodium recommendations. Current guidelines recommend that people should limit their intake of sodium to 1.5  to 2.4 grams per day, but these recommendations are based on projections and have never been tested in clinical trials or other large studies.

Two papers from the  ongoing Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study offer fresh evidence against the low sodium recommendations.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

IMPROVE-IT Trial Scheduled For Presentation In November Reply

Results of the eagerly-awaited and highly controversial IMPROVE-IT trial are finally going to be revealed. The American Heart Association has announced that the  trial will be presented by Chris Cannon on November 17 at 11:51 AM (central time) in Chicago at the group’s annual scientific sessions . IMPROVE-IT compared the effect on cardiovascular outcomes of the statin simvastatin with Vytorin (the combination of simvastatin and ezetimibe, manufactured by Merck) in more than 18,000 patients with acute coronary syndromes.

Both Vytorin and IMPROVE-IT have been the subject of considerable controversy.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Warning: Neck Adjustments Might Lead To Stroke 2

After a neck adjustment — also known as cervical manipulative therapy and typically employed by chiropractors and other healthcare providers — people are at increased risk for cervical dissections (tears), which can lead to stroke, according to a scientific statement released by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Although a cause-and-effect relationship is far from being proved, the groups say that healthcare providers should tell their patients about the association before starting the procedure.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Superficial dissection of the right side of th...

Superficial dissection of the right side of the neck, showing the carotid and subclavian arteries. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

No Retraction For You! Review Panel Exonerates Medical Journal In Statin Kerfuffle Reply

An independent review panel has rejected a demand by a prominent researcher that TheBMJ retract two controversial articles. The report largely exonerates the journal’s editors from any wrongdoing.

As previously reported, Rory Collins, a prominent researcher and head of the Cholesterol Treatment Trialists’ (CTT) Collaboration, had demanded that TheBMJ retract two articles that were highly critical of statins. Although TheBMJ issued a correction for both papers for inaccurately citing an earlier publication and therefore overstating the incidence of adverse effects of statins, this response did not satisfy Collins. He repeatedly demanded that the journal issue a full retraction of the articles, prompting TheBMJ’s editor-in-chief, Fiona Godlee, to convene an outside panel of experts to review the problem.

The report of the independent statins review panel exonerates TheBMJ from wrongdoing and said the controversial articles should not be retracted:

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Guideline Critics Shift Attacks From Beta Blockers To Statins Reply

With the release today of updated European and US guidelines the ongoing controversy regarding beta-blockers appears to be resolved. But that doesn’t necessarily mean there will be an outbreak of guideline peace and harmony. The critics who helped ignite the controversy over beta blockers now say new statin recommendations contained in the guidelines are based on deeply flawed evidence.

Both the new European and US guidelines say that preoperative initiation of statin therapy may be considered in patients undergoing vascular surgery and that people already taking statins should continue taking them. Now some of the same critics who attacked the reliability of the beta blocker guideline say that this recommendation is not supported by the evidence.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

 

 

Hormone Therapy At Menopause Fails To Halt Heart Disease Progression 1

More than a decade ago the Women’s Health Study produced surprising and important results when it showed that broad use of hormone replacement therapy did not reduce cardiovascular risk in post-menopausal women. But the study also led to speculation  that hormone therapy  might be beneficial when delivered closer to the time of menopause. Now a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine shows that menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) may have some favorable effects on some cardiovascular risk factors but it does not reduce the progression of atherosclerosis.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Death By Running: It’s The Heat And Not The Heart Reply

The growing popularity of marathons and other extreme sports has sparked worries about the potential dangers of these activities. The popular press and medical research have both focused on the risk of cardiac arrest and other heart rhythm problems. But  that concern may be misdirected. A new study from Israel published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology finds that a much more serious danger may be heat stroke, which is defined as a core body temperature above 104 or 105 degrees associated with multiorgan dysfunction.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

English: Marthon Tel Aviv - A view on the beac...

English: Marthon Tel Aviv – A view on the beach עברית: מרתון תל אביב – מראה על הים (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Running: Any Amount Is Good And More May Not Be Better Reply

Although there is broad agreement that exercise is beneficial there has been substantial uncertainty about how much exercise is good for you. Recently some studies have suggested that too much exercise may actually reduce the benefits of exercise. Now a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology finds that even a small amount of exercise, even running for as little as 5 minutes a day, may be just as healthful as more exercise.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

More Questions Raised About Boehringer Ingelheim’s Pradaxa 1

Once again dabigatran (Pradaxa) has raised the wrath of the critics. Several articles and an editorial published today in The BMJ raise more questions and concerns about the drug, which is the first of the new oral anticoagulants. Relying on new evidence along with previously disclosed data, Deborah Cohen, the  investigations editor for The BMJ, casts doubt on the reliability of the data supporting the drug as well as the behavior and decisions of regulatory authorities, trial investigators, and employees  of Boehringer Ingelheim, the drug’s manufacturer.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Probiotics May Help Reduce Blood Pressure Reply

As interest in probiotics has grown in recent years, some evidence has emerged that probiotics may favorably reduce blood pressure, but trials have been small and inconsistent. Now a meta-analysis published in Hypertension suggests that the blood-pressure lowering effects of probiotics may be genuine.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

New Evidence Fuels Concerns About The Safety Of Niacin Reply

The string of failures– for HDL therapies in general and for niacin in particular– continues unabated.  The publication of the main results of the HPS2-THRIVE trial, along with new information from the AIM-HIGH trial, provide no evidence of a beneficial effect for niacin but do fuel concerns that it may cause serious adverse effects.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.