The Complicated Story Behind Yet Another Disappeared Article At A Top Heart Journal Reply

Once again the European Heart Journal has “unpublished” an article without any notice of retraction or explanation. Strangely, the article– Russian science through the prism of intelligence: is fraud still possible?– can still be viewed (at least for now) with a vestigial URL , but it can not be found through the usual channels on the journal site. The pages for the story on PubMed and the EHJ site now state: “This article has been temporarily removed.”

…a more careful examination of the original article leads to the suspicion that this story is a bit more complicated and raises questions both about the internal peer review process at the EHJ and about the original paper.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

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IMPROVE-IT Trial Scheduled For Presentation In November Reply

Results of the eagerly-awaited and highly controversial IMPROVE-IT trial are finally going to be revealed. The American Heart Association has announced that the  trial will be presented by Chris Cannon on November 17 at 11:51 AM (central time) in Chicago at the group’s annual scientific sessions . IMPROVE-IT compared the effect on cardiovascular outcomes of the statin simvastatin with Vytorin (the combination of simvastatin and ezetimibe, manufactured by Merck) in more than 18,000 patients with acute coronary syndromes.

Both Vytorin and IMPROVE-IT have been the subject of considerable controversy.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Study Offers Little Support for an Old Drug Reply

Digoxin is one of the oldest drugs in the cardiovascular arsenal, derived from the foxglove plant and first described in the 18th century by William Withering. It is frequently used in patients with heart failure (HF) and with atrial fibrillation (AF). The few trials supporting its use were performed in HF patients before newer treatments arrived. There have been no good trials in AF.

A new observational study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology now provides the most detailed perspective on digoxin use in AF. …

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014; 64(7): 660-668.

 

 

Warning: Neck Adjustments Might Lead To Stroke 2

After a neck adjustment — also known as cervical manipulative therapy and typically employed by chiropractors and other healthcare providers — people are at increased risk for cervical dissections (tears), which can lead to stroke, according to a scientific statement released by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Although a cause-and-effect relationship is far from being proved, the groups say that healthcare providers should tell their patients about the association before starting the procedure.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Superficial dissection of the right side of th...

Superficial dissection of the right side of the neck, showing the carotid and subclavian arteries. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Principal Investigator Of Suspended Cytori Stem Cell Trials Remains Hopeful Reply

Shares of Cytori Therapeutics took a big bit hit today after the company disclosed in a press release that it had suspended enrollment in its ATHENA and ATHENA II trials. This kind of news is never a good sign, but the   principal investigator of the trial tells me that he believes the current problems are surmountable and that the trials are still viable.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Clot Busters For Stroke Gain More Support Reply

Although thrombolysis for ischemic stroke has been widely recognized as beneficial, its use has been limited because of concerns about its effects on patients treated after 3 hours, on older patients, and on patients with mild and with severe strokes. Now a new metaanalysis published in the Lancet offers evidence that the use of thrombolysis should be more aggressively pursued.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

 

No Retraction For You! Review Panel Exonerates Medical Journal In Statin Kerfuffle Reply

An independent review panel has rejected a demand by a prominent researcher that TheBMJ retract two controversial articles. The report largely exonerates the journal’s editors from any wrongdoing.

As previously reported, Rory Collins, a prominent researcher and head of the Cholesterol Treatment Trialists’ (CTT) Collaboration, had demanded that TheBMJ retract two articles that were highly critical of statins. Although TheBMJ issued a correction for both papers for inaccurately citing an earlier publication and therefore overstating the incidence of adverse effects of statins, this response did not satisfy Collins. He repeatedly demanded that the journal issue a full retraction of the articles, prompting TheBMJ’s editor-in-chief, Fiona Godlee, to convene an outside panel of experts to review the problem.

The report of the independent statins review panel exonerates TheBMJ from wrongdoing and said the controversial articles should not be retracted:

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Guideline Critics Shift Attacks From Beta Blockers To Statins Reply

With the release today of updated European and US guidelines the ongoing controversy regarding beta-blockers appears to be resolved. But that doesn’t necessarily mean there will be an outbreak of guideline peace and harmony. The critics who helped ignite the controversy over beta blockers now say new statin recommendations contained in the guidelines are based on deeply flawed evidence.

Both the new European and US guidelines say that preoperative initiation of statin therapy may be considered in patients undergoing vascular surgery and that people already taking statins should continue taking them. Now some of the same critics who attacked the reliability of the beta blocker guideline say that this recommendation is not supported by the evidence.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

 

 

Dutch Investigation Finds Serious Flaws In Influential New England Journal Of Medicine Study Reply

Erasmus Medical Center says it has wrapped up its investigation of Don Poldermans, the disgraced cardiology researcher who was fired for research misconduct. The full extent of the misconduct has never been known, and from an examination of the Erasmus report it appears likely that it never will be known.

One major finding– though downplayed in the medical center’s press release– is that the most prestigious and influential publication from the Poldermans’ group, the 1999 publication of the DECREASE 1 study in the New England Journal of Medicine– appears to be riddled with serious problems.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

 

Medicine faculty of the Erasmus MC, taken in t...

Medicine faculty of the Erasmus MC, taken in the afternoon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Hormone Therapy At Menopause Fails To Halt Heart Disease Progression 1

More than a decade ago the Women’s Health Study produced surprising and important results when it showed that broad use of hormone replacement therapy did not reduce cardiovascular risk in post-menopausal women. But the study also led to speculation  that hormone therapy  might be beneficial when delivered closer to the time of menopause. Now a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine shows that menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) may have some favorable effects on some cardiovascular risk factors but it does not reduce the progression of atherosclerosis.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Death By Running: It’s The Heat And Not The Heart Reply

The growing popularity of marathons and other extreme sports has sparked worries about the potential dangers of these activities. The popular press and medical research have both focused on the risk of cardiac arrest and other heart rhythm problems. But  that concern may be misdirected. A new study from Israel published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology finds that a much more serious danger may be heat stroke, which is defined as a core body temperature above 104 or 105 degrees associated with multiorgan dysfunction.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

English: Marthon Tel Aviv - A view on the beac...

English: Marthon Tel Aviv – A view on the beach עברית: מרתון תל אביב – מראה על הים (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Running: Any Amount Is Good And More May Not Be Better Reply

Although there is broad agreement that exercise is beneficial there has been substantial uncertainty about how much exercise is good for you. Recently some studies have suggested that too much exercise may actually reduce the benefits of exercise. Now a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology finds that even a small amount of exercise, even running for as little as 5 minutes a day, may be just as healthful as more exercise.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

More Questions Raised About Boehringer Ingelheim’s Pradaxa 1

Once again dabigatran (Pradaxa) has raised the wrath of the critics. Several articles and an editorial published today in The BMJ raise more questions and concerns about the drug, which is the first of the new oral anticoagulants. Relying on new evidence along with previously disclosed data, Deborah Cohen, the  investigations editor for The BMJ, casts doubt on the reliability of the data supporting the drug as well as the behavior and decisions of regulatory authorities, trial investigators, and employees  of Boehringer Ingelheim, the drug’s manufacturer.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Study Finds Flaws in New Treatment For Blood Clots Reply

In recent years, catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) has been added to the current standard of anticoagulation therapy in some patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The hope was that CDT would help reduce the high rate of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), but now an observational study finds no benefits and some important disadvantages associated with CDT.

In a report published in JAMA Internal Medicine, Riyaz Bashir and colleagues analyzed data from more than 90,000 patients hospitalized for DVT, 3649 of whom received CDT plus anticoagulation.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Probiotics May Help Reduce Blood Pressure Reply

As interest in probiotics has grown in recent years, some evidence has emerged that probiotics may favorably reduce blood pressure, but trials have been small and inconsistent. Now a meta-analysis published in Hypertension suggests that the blood-pressure lowering effects of probiotics may be genuine.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

New Evidence Fuels Concerns About The Safety Of Niacin Reply

The string of failures– for HDL therapies in general and for niacin in particular– continues unabated.  The publication of the main results of the HPS2-THRIVE trial, along with new information from the AIM-HIGH trial, provide no evidence of a beneficial effect for niacin but do fuel concerns that it may cause serious adverse effects.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

 

Cleveland Clinic Once Again Tops Heart Hospital Rankings Reply

For the twentieth year in a row the Cleveland Clinic made the #1 spot on the US News & World Report‘s annual ranking of heart hospitals. The Cleveland Clinic was 4th in the overall category. For the first time the Mayo Clinic was the top hospital overall, beating long-time rivals Massachusetts General and Johns Hopkins.

As I’ve stated before, I am not a big fan of these sort of ratings. But irrational as they may be they often have enormous practical significance.

Here’s the top 20:

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

FDA Once Again Reaches Conclusions At Odds With Its Own Staff Reply

Once again the FDA has reached a conclusion that is directly opposed by some of its own scientists.  Last month the FDA affirmed the safety of olmesartan, a popular blood pressure lowering drug (sold as Benicar and other names). But that reassuring view is not shared by the  FDA scientists who performed the study that provided the basis for the review. And now outside experts are also raising concerns about the drug.

Back in 2010 the FDA said that it was initiating a safety review of olmesartan due to troubling findings from 2 clinical trials that raised the possibility that patients with type 2 diabetes taking olmesartan might have an increased risk of cardiovascular death. Four years later the FDA announced  that it had completed that review.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes, including comments from Sanjay Kaul and Franz Messerli and Sripal Bangalore.

FDA Places Clinical Hold On Phase 3 Trial Of Novel Anticoagulant Reply

A highly promising novel anticoagulant system now appears to be in serious difficulty. Regado Biosciences announced today that the FDA had placed a “clinical hold” on patient enrollment and dosing in the REGULATE-PCI trial, which is testing the Revolixys anticoagulation system. Revolixys consists of the Factor IX inhibitor pegnivacogin and an agent, anivamersen, which reverses its anticoagulant effect.

REGULATE-PCI is a phase 3 trial comparing Revolixys to bivalirudin (Angiomax, The Medicines Company) in 13,000 patients undergoing PCI.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

 

 

Study Explores Expanded Use For Edwards’ And Medtronic’s New Heart Valves Reply

In the last few years transcatheter aortic valve replacements from Edwards Lifesciences and Medtronic have entered the marketplace and now offer an alternative to surgery for some patients. Now these valves are being considered for use in patients who have already undergone surgery but whose bioprosthetic valves have failed.

Although surgeons and patients increasingly prefer bioprosthetic valves to mechanical valves, the chief drawback to the bioprosthetic valves is that they may eventually deteriorate, which means that more and more physicians and patients will inevitably be faced with the dilemma of how best to treat degenerated valves. Although surgical reoperation is considered the best solution, many patients are too old and frail for surgery. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been proposed for use in this situation, though the risks and benefits have not as yet been well defined.

Now, a new study in JAMA provides information on 459 patients with failed bioprosthetic valves who underwent TAVI with either the Edwards Sapien device or the Medtronic Corevalve device.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Controversial Trial Finds No Benefit For Expensive Medicines Company Drug Reply

Although there is broad consensus in the medical community that primary PCI is the best treatment for heart attack patients when it can be delivered promptly, there is no agreement about the best accompanying drug regimen, which usually entails a combination of antiplatelet and antithrombotic drugs. The role of one antithrombotic, bivalirudin (Angiomax, The Medicines Company) has been particularly uncertain because it is far more expensive than its alternative, unfractionated heparin.

HEAT-PPCI was designed to help settle this problem.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Merck Uses Legal Threats To Stifle Negative Advice About Zetia And Vytorin In Italy Reply

In response to repeated legal threats, a public health doctor in Italy has withdrawn advice to curtail use of a controversial drug. The drug, ezetimibe, is a key ingredient in Zetia and Vytorin, which is manufactured by Merck. The cholesterol-lowering drug has been the subject of fierce controversy because it has never been shown to improve clinical outcomes. Despite the controversy, in 2013 the drugs had combined sales of more than $2.6 billion.

MSD Italy, the Italian arm of the company, sent two “cease and desist” letters to Alberto Donzelli, who is “the head of education, appropriateness, and evidence based medicine at the public health authority of Milan (Milan Healthcare),” according to The  BMJwhich published a news report of the affair.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

More Sunshine: CMS Wants Companies To Report Payments To Physicians For Medical Education Reply

In a major reversal of policy, CMS wants industry to report payments to physicians for continuing medical education. The move would eliminate from the Physician Payment Sunshine Act the current exemption for CME.

Initially CMS’s  proposal for implementation of the Sunshine Act required industry to report payments to physicians for CME programs. But after considerable debate and lobbying from industry, the final rule included an exemption. As a result, companies are not now required to report payments to speakers at accredited CME events as long as the companies don’t select the speakers or directly pay them.

CMS now appears to have changed its mind. Near the end of its list of proposed changes for next year, CMS is proposing to eliminate the exemption:

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Januvia Linked To Increase in Heart Failure Hospitalizations Reply

The cardiovascular effects of drugs used for glucose control in patients with diabetes have been a subject of controversy for many years now. More recently, attention has started to focus specifically on the risk for heart failure. Now, an observational study will likely raise new questions about the dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor sitagliptin (Januvia, Merck).

In a paper published in JACC Heart Failure, Daniala Weir and colleagues analyzed insurance claims from a database of more than 7600 patients with diabetes and heart failure.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

 

ESC Hot Lines: First Real Data On Promising Novartis Heart Failure Drug Reply

The first real details about the much-anticipated novel new heart failure drug from Novartis will kick off this year’s Hot Line sessions at the annual meeting of the European Society of Cardiology in Barcelona, Spain. The meeting runs from August 30 until September 3.

As I have previously reported, the PARADIGM-HF trial was stopped because of a highly statistically significant reduction in cardiovascular mortality in patients taking LCZ696 (a novel, first-in-class Angiotensin Receptor Neprilysin Inhibitor) instead of the current gold standard of treatment, an ACE inhibitor….

Here is the complete list of Hot Line trials:

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.