European Review Confirms Increased Risk with Ivabradine Reply

Following a review provoked by troubling findings that emerged from a large clinical trial, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) is making several recommendations intended to lower the risk of heart problems linked to the heart-rate-lowering drug ivabradine. The drug is marketed by Servier in Europe under the brand names of Corlentor and Procoralan and is indicated for the treatment of heart failure and stable angina. The drug is not available in the U.S. but is under development by Amgen for the indication of heart failure.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

 

 

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At the American Heart Association Meeting You Really Can’t Escape The New Cholesterol Drugs 1

There’s no escaping them. At the American Heart Association in Chicago going on right now Amgen and Sanofi/Regeneron, which are developing competing cholesterol lowering drugs known as PCSK9 inhibitors, have mounted a full scale attack to capture the eyeballs and the brains of cardiologists and any other innocent bystanders who happen to be at the McCormick convention center.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

Amgen Door Hanger

 

SIGNIFY Trial Provokes Sound And Fury Over Controversial Servier and Amgen Drug Reply

The controversial drug ivabradine just got a little more controversial. The drug, which is marketed by Servier under the brand names of Corlentor and Procoralan, is available in Europe and elsewhere and is used for the treatment of heart failure and stable angina. The drug is not available in the US, but it is under development by Amgen for a heart failure indication.

Now a very large new study presented at the European Society of Cardiology meeting in Barcelona and published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine has found no evidence of benefit in a stable angina population and found more adverse events associated with the drug and even suggested the likelihood of harm in a very large and important trial subgroup. The findings have resulted in an investigation by the European Medicines Agency, placing a cloud over the future status of the drug.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Silencio! Claiming Pressure From European Regulators, Trial Leaders Cancel Press Conference Reply

Investigators of the much-anticipated and controversial SIGNIFY trial have told the European Society of Cardiology leadership that they will not participate in a previously scheduled press conference on Sunday at the society’s main meeting in Barcelona. But they say they will present the main results of their trial at a Hot Line session later in the afternoon.

According to the ESC, the SIGNIFY investigators, who include Kim Fox, Ian Ford, Philippe Gabriel Steg, Jean-Claude Tardif, Michal Tendera, and Roberto Ferrari, told the ESC leadership that regulators at the European Medicines Authority (EMA) had told the investigators that because they (the investigators) were scheduled to appear before the EMA they should not discuss or comment on their trial outside the official presentation at the ESC conference.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

 

 

Sharp Scrutiny From European Medicines Agency Of Amgen And Servier Heart Drug Reply

There may be trouble on the horizon for ivabradine, a heart drug marketed by Servier under the brand names of Corlentor and Procoralan. The drug is widely available in Europe and elsewhere, though it is not available in the US, where it is under development by Amgen. Although it hasn’t been widely noticed– I can find no other press reports– the European Medicines Agency said that it has started a review of the drug based on troubling findings from the SIGNIFY study. (Ivabradine is used to treat patients with long-term stable angina and long-term heart failure.)

The main results of SIGNIFY are scheduled to be presented on August 31 at the European Society of Cardiology meeting in Barcelona. But on May 8 the European Medicines Agency announced that it had initiated a review of ivabradine based on  preliminary results…

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FDA Grants Fast Track Status To Amgen Heart Failure Drug Reply

Amgen announced yesterday that its new chronic heart failure drug ivabradine had been granted fast track status by the FDA. The company said the fast track designation, which is for drugs that treat serious conditions and fill an umet medical need, will aid the development and speed the review of the drug.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

New Guideline Recommends Conservative Treatment for Heart Patients with Anemia Reply

The American College of Physicians (ACP) is recommending more conservative use of transfusions and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in anemia patients with heart disease. But the authors of the new clinical practice guidelines, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, acknowledge that the evidence base is too flimsy to support firm conclusions.

“Overall,” wrote the authors, “despite the epidemiologic and biologically plausible association of anemia with poor outcomes, we did not find consistent evidence that anemia correction improves outcomes in patients with heart disease…” The poor outcomes of heart patients with anemia have prompted aggressive treatment strategies, but “it is unclear whether these strategies improve outcomes.”

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

The Fate Of New Cholesterol Drugs Depends On IMPROVE-IT Reply

Prospects for the highly anticipated new class of cholesterol-lowering drugs, the PCSK9 inhibitors, took a wild roller coaster ride this week. The publication of new lipid guidelines by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology led many observers to think that the promising new drugs under development by Regeneron (in partnership with Sanofi), Amgen, and Pfizer might suffer significant delays.

The guidelines delivered a strong statement questioning the increasingly controversial theory that LDL lowering by itself is beneficial. “We found that non-statin therapies really didn’t provide an acceptable risk reduction benefit compared to their potential for adverse effects in the routine prevention of heart attack and stroke,” said the co-chair of the guideline. This led many observers to think that the FDA would likely require the developers of PCSK9 inhibitors to complete cardiovascular outcome trials before getting US approval. This decision would delay approval for several years.

Then, on Thursday, the companies developing PCSK9 inhibitors received some apparent good news. Bloomberg News reported that an FDA official said that the drugs “will only have to meet the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s existing standards for clearance, including whether they cut cholesterol and reduce blood pressure or inflammation.”

But then the FDA added one other very important caveat. Here’s how they phrased it to me:

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Amgen Trial Fails To Show Benefit Of Anemia Drug In Heart Failure Patients Reply

Deutsch: Amgen als Sponsor der Tour of California

 

The bad news continues for Aranesp (darbepoetin alfa), Amgen’s long-acting erythropoietin-stimulating agent. The drug is intended to stimulate red cell blood production in patients with anemia. Amgen today announced the top line results of a large phase 3 heart failure trial of the drug and said  the trial had failed to meet its primary endpoint.

 

The RED-HF (Reduction of Events With Darbepoetin Alfa in Heart Failure) Trial, which started in 2006, had randomized 2,278 patients with heart failure and anemia to receive either Aranesp or placebo.

 

Click here to read the full story on Forbes.

 

Amgen Pleads Guilty To Misbranding Anemia Drug Aranesp Reply

Biotechnology giant Amgen today pleaded guilty in federal court to a misdemeanor charge of misbranding Aranesp (darbepoetin alfa), its highly successful anemia drug. The government accused Amgen of marketing Aranesp for indications not approved by the FDA and other illegal marketing practices.

The judge deferred a decision on the plea until Wednesday. When the final settlement is announced further details about pending civil suits against Amgen will be unveiled. The acting US Attorney said that the terms of the agreements will include multiple measures to insure that Amgen complies with regulations. The measures will mean that Amgen “won’t view this as the cost of doing business,” he said in a press conference.

The agreement includes $150 million for criminal fines and penalties and an additional $612 million civil settlement. In 2011 Amgen reported $2.3 billion in sales for Aranesp.

Aranesp is approved to treat anemia in chemotherapy patients and in anemia patients with chronic kidney disease. The label now includes a black box warning that it can increase the risk of death, MI, stroke, venous thromboembolism, thrombosis of vascular access, and tumor progression or recurrence.

Although it had been the subject of earlier questions, serious criticism emerged with the publication in 2009 of the TREAT trial, which found no clinical benefit for the drug in patients with chronic kidney disease. Results of TREAT prompted a dramatic FDA advisory committee meeting in 2010 followed by a major label revision in 2011.

Click here for a PDF of the US Attorney’s Explanation of the Charges.