FDA Advisory Panel Recommends Expanded Indication For Sapien Transcatheter Heart Valve Reply

The FDA’s Circulatory System Devices Panel voted overwhelmingly on Wednesday to recommend an expanded indication for the Edwards Sapien Transcatheter Heart Valve in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who have high operative risk. The device is currently approved for use only in patients who are not surgical candidates.

The committee voted 10-2 that the Sapien device was safe, 12-0 that it was effective, and 11-0, with 1 abstention, that the benefits of the device outweigh the risks. Much of the day was spent by committee members wrestling with a number of difficult questions raised by FDA reviewers prior to the meeting, including the possible introduction of bias in the pivotal PARTNER A trial  because some patients randomized to surgery did not undergo surgery, the difficulty of evaluating the transapical approach due to the small number of patients randomized in that stratum of PARTNER, and the higher incidence of stroke and aortic regurgitation in the Sapien group.

Ultimately, however, the committee was persuaded by the totality of the data from PARTNER and additional nonrandomized data from patients who received the device under a continued access protocol. An additional strong source of reassurance for the panel was the safeguard provided by the TVT registry, a joint initiative from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) and The American College of Cardiology (ACC) that will closely monitor the use of TVR in clinical practice.

In sharp contrast to many recent advisory committee meetings, this panel was marked by the absence of drama and tension. A high point of the meeting for many observers was the public comment session. One speaker was a 92-year-old Sapien recipient who was a World War II veteran and prisoner or war who had survived the Bataan Death March. Another patient who spoke in favor of Sapien was the father of well-known Columbia University interventional cardiologist Jeffrey Moses, who helped develop the device. Moses said that he “wisely” chose to stay out of the case, though initially he did help persuade his father to accept the device after he refused to undergo surgery.

Related reading: 

About these ads

Live Blog: FDA Advisory Panel For Edwards Sapien Transcatheter Heart Valve Reply

Here’s my live-blog of the FDA’s meeting of the Circulatory System Devices Panel to consider the premarket approval (PMA) application for the Edwards Sapien Transcatheter Heart Valve for use in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who have high operative risk. As reported here earlier this week, FDA reviewers have raised a number of questions about the safety and efficacy of the Sapien heart valve system. Here is a link to the FDA and Edwards briefing documents.

============================================

Meeting adjourned.

6:00– The committee votes 10-2 that Sapien is safe, 12-0 that it is effective, and 11-0 (1 abstention) that the benefits outweigh the risks. 

5:55– Here’s questions 2 and 3:

VOTING QUESTION 2: Is there reasonable assurance that the Edwards SAPIENTM Transcatheter Heart Valve is effective for use in patients who meet the criteria specified in the proposed indication?

VOTING QUESTION 3: Do the benefits of the Edwards SAPIENTM Transcatheter Heart Valve for use in patients who meet the criteria specified in the proposed indication outweigh the risks for use in patients who meet the criteria specified in the proposed indication?

5:54– Wow– computer voting system is broken! They’re going to vote on paper.

5:48– After they finish the legal mumbo jumbo the voting will begin.

5:43– Getting close to the voting questions. Here’s #1:

VOTING QUESTION 1: Is there reasonable assurance that the Edwards SAPIENTM Transcatheter Heart Valve is safe for use in patients who meet the criteria specified in the proposed indication?

5:39– Edwards via Craig Smith giving their summary. He says he’ll be brief.

5:38– Now talking about study data that should be included in the labeling.

5:30– Now talking about post-approval studies to get further insights into stroke, aortic regurgitation, long term effectiveness, valve-in-valve, and gender issues.

5:28– Now discussing the totality of the evidence. Chairman states that the committee agrees that Sapien is safe and effective, with a number of caveats, such as stroke, TA/TF, gender, AR. (Why bother voting now?)

5:20– Committee now discussing informed consent and whether a more detailed informed consent form should be required. An additional piece of paper is not really the ideal solution.

5:15– Chairman summarizes that the FDA is concerned that valve-in-valve use may occur, but there’s no data to support this. Committee strongly encourages getting data on this and it should not be endorsed on the label. Committee wants to motivate the company to perform a separate clinical trial for this indication.
Click to continue reading…

Consensus Document Provides Roadmap To Uptake Of TAVI In US 3

Following the recent approval by the FDA of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), the ACC, AATS, SCAI, and STS, in conjunction with several other medical organizations, have released a critical consensus document to guide use of the new landmark procedure.

“We have tried to collate the evidence into a coherent road map for judicious use, rational dispersion, and careful post-marketing scrutiny of this promising technology,” said Sanjay Kaul, vice chair of the writing committee, in a press release. “It is now the collective responsibility of all the stakeholders to optimize its full potential for improving the duration as well as the quality of survival in patients with severe symptomatic aortic valvular stenosis.”

Here are some of the key recommendations identified by the committee:

–Careful patient selection

–Team-based approach given the complexity of procedure coupled with the high-risk profile of suitable patients, many of whom have extensive comorbid conditions that require ongoing management

–Specialized heart centers and physician expertise in treating valve disorders; this includes use of proctors as needed to serve on the heart care team during the first few cases, as well as proper facilities (hybrid operating rooms or modified cath labs)

–TAVR screening tests to inform treatment decisions

–Enhanced patient and family education in the risk and benefits of this procedure

–Ongoing evaluation and participation in national TAVR registry to assess real world outcomes

The document also emphasizes the groups for whom TAVR is not recommended:

–An acceptable surgical risk for conventional surgical AVR

–Known bicuspid aortic valve

–Severe mitral annular calcification or severe MR

–Moderate AS

–Other (e.g., severe AR and subaortic stenosis)

Click here to read the press release from the ACC, AATS, SCAI, and STS…