Pfizer Starts Testing For Over-The-Counter Lipitor Reply

Looking backward to improve its future, Pfizer will once again try to gain FDA approval to market its blockbuster drug, atorvastatin (Lipitor), over-the-counter (OTC). Peter Loftus reports in the Wall Street Journal that the company has started a clinical study to support the application for low-dose atorvastatin (10 mg).

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

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Packaging Defect Leads Merck To Recall All Lots of Liptruzet In US Reply

Merck said today that it was recalling all lots of Liptruzet, its combination of the cholesterol-lowering drugs ezetimibe and atorvastatin, in the US. The company said the recall was due to a packaging defect which could potentially allow air and moisture to affect the quality of the drug, though the company said “the likelihood of the packaging defects decreasing the effectiveness of Liptruzet on a patient’s lipid profile or negatively impacting the safety of the product is remote.” To date there have been no adverse events or product complaints reported to the company.

Merck is recalling the drug from US wholesalers but is not asking patients or pharmacies to return their stock. The company said that patients may continue taking the pills already in their possession.

Today action will deplete the current supply of the drug in the US, the company said. The company said it will resupply the drug “as soon as possible.”

 

Low Rate Of Problems With Statins In Study Of Quarter Million Patients 1

A very large analysis of previously published studies finds that statins are generally safe and well tolerated, but helps confirm previous links to a small increased risk for diabetes and elevation of liver enzymes. Some statins were better tolerated than other statins and lower-dose statins were better tolerated than high dose statins.

In a paper published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and OutcomesHuseyin Naci and colleagues report their findings from a systematic review of clinical trials with statins for both primary and secondary prevention. The data from 55 placebo controlled trials and 80 trials included nearly 250,000 subjects comparing statins to placebo or to other statins. Previous analyses of available data have generally confirmed the overall benign profile of statins, but have not explored in depth the differences between statins and the effect of different doses of individual statins.

The new study found no differences between statins and placebos in the rate of discontinuations due to myalgia, CK elevation and cancer, but statins were associated with a higher risk for diabetes (OR 1.09, CI 1.02-1.16) and transaminase elevations (OR 1.51, CI 1.24-1.84).

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

FDA Approves Combination Of Ezetimibe And Atorvastatin Reply

The FDA has approved a new combination drug from Merck for lowering cholesterol. The drug, which will carry the brand name of Liptruzet, is a combination of two previously approved cholesterol-lowering drugs, ezetimibe and atorvastatin.

Merck said the new drug (pronounced “LIP-true-zett”) would be commercially available starting next week. Liptruzet will be available as a once-daily tablet combining 10 mg of ezetimibe with either 10, 20, 40, or 80 mg of atorvastatin. In clinical trials Liptruzet lowered LDL cholesterol from 53% to 61%, depending on dosage.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Blood Sample Mismatch Leads ‘Anguished’ Authors To Retract Three Lipitor Papers 1

Three substudies of the influential TNT (Treating to New Targets) trial have been retracted after the sponsor of the trial, Pfizer, discovered that blood samples from the study had been matched to the wrong participants.

The main results of TNT, published in 2005 in the New England Journal of Medicine, had a major impact on clinical practice and statin prescription patterns. The trial supported the increasingly aggressive use of statins and helped to solidify the enormous commercial success of atorvastatin (Lipitor, Pfizer).

The 3 newly-retracted substudies do not appear to affect the main finding of TNT. Two papers were published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The third was published in the American Heart Journal. (The AHJ retraction notice has not yet been published, but the editors have confirmed the retraction.) Here are the 3 retracted articles:

Click here to read the full story on Forbes:

 

English: A package and pill of atorvastatin 40...

Following Earlier Recall, Ranbaxy Halts Manufacturing Atorvastatin Reply

Ranbaxy, the often-troubled manufacturer of generic drugs, will temporarily stop manufacturing generic atorvastatin. On November 9, 2012 the company announced a voluntary recall of some lots of atorvastatin because of possible contamination with glass particles. An FDA statement today said that Ranbaxy will discontinue making the drug “until it has thoroughly investigated the cause of the glass particulates and remedied the problem.”

To date, no reports of harm from the contamination have been received by the FDA. Both FDA and Ranbaxy believe there is only a low likelihood that there will be adverse events related to the problem.

The FDA said it does not anticipate a shortage of atorvastatin because of the recall, but that it “is working with other manufacturers of atorvastatin to ensure adequate market supply.”
Click to read the FDA statement…

Atorvastatin Lifts Ranbaxy While Pfizer Abandons Its Lipitor Marketing Efforts Reply

Pfizer will no longer aggressively market Lipitor (atorvastatin), its former crown jewel and the most lucrative pharmaceutical product ever. At the same time, generic drug manufacturer Ranbaxy posted record revenue for the last business quarter, growth fueled largely by sales of generic atorvastatin in the United States.

Pfizer told the Wall Street Journal that it was abandoning efforts to market Lipitor. It said it was no longer selling Lipitor to health plans, that it had stopped using drug reps to promote the drug to physicians, and that it had ceased all Lipitor advertising. The Pfizer move comes after the expiration of the Lipitor patent last fall but immediately prior to May 31, when a host of new generic versions of atorvastatin are expected to enter the marketplace.

Pfizer mounted an aggressive campaign to retain as much of the atorvastatin market as possible in the early days after the loss of market exclusivity. In the first quarter, according to the Journal, Lipitor revenues for Pfizer were $383 million. This was more than most analysts had originally anticipated, until Pfizer rolled out its aggressive campaign, but paled in comparison to the $12.9 billion annual sales of the drug at its peak. Pfizer said it had spent $87 million marketing Lipitor in the quarter.

Also in the first quarter, Ranbaxy sales in the US doubled to $375 million. This was the first full quarter in which the company sold generic atorvastatin. In March, for the first time, Ranbaxy had a greater share of the atorvastatin market than Pfizer, according to Fierce Pharma.

 

Statins and Diabetes: Real Concern or Much Ado About Nothing? 6

Updated at 7 PM with a detailed comment at the bottom from C. Michael Minder of Johns Hopkins–

In New York Times Op-Ed piece on Monday, Eric Topol comments on last week’s announcement by the FDA that it was changing the label for statins. Topol focuses on the new warning that statins raise the risk of diabetes. He opens with a provocative statement:

We’re overdosing on cholesterol-lowering statins, and the consequence could be a sharp increase in the incidence of Type 2 diabetes.

Topol does the math and calculates that 20 million Americans taking statins equates to 100,000 new statin-induced diabetics:

Not a good thing for the public health and certainly not good for the individual affected with a new serious chronic illness… If there were a major suppression of heart attacks or strokes or deaths, that might be justified. But in patients who have never had heart disease and are taking statins to lower their risk (so-called primary prevention), the reduction of heart attacks and other major events is only 2 per 100. And we don’t know who the 2 per 100 patients are who benefit or the one per 200 who will get diabetes! Moreover, the margin of benefit to risk is quite narrow.

Topol then concludes that statins are beneficial for secondary prevention in people with a history of heart disease or stroke but for “the vast majority of people who take statins — those who have never had any heart disease — there should be a careful review of whether the statin is necessary, in light of the risk of diabetes and the relatively small benefit that can be derived.”
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