FDA Removes Restrictions On Avandia Reply

In a remarkable climax to a long-running drama, the FDA today lifted major restrictions on rosiglitazone (Avandia, GlaxoSmithKline). The drug has been the subject of  intense criticism and controversy since the 2007 publication of the famous Nissen meta-analsysis that first raised the possibility that the blockbuster diabetes drug might increase the risk of heart attack and cardiovascular death.

The FDA said its actions were “consistent with the recommendations of expert advisory committees.” In June of this year an FDA panel reviewed re-adjudicated data from the RECORD (Rosiglitazone Evaluated for Cardiovascular Outcomes and Regulation of Glycemia in Diabetes) trial and concluded that the trial had not found an elevated risk of heart attack or death associated with rosiglitazone.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

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FDA Approves First SGLT2 Inhibitor For Diabetes 1

The FDA said today that it had approved canaglifozin (Invokana, Johnson & Johnson), the first of a new class of diabetes drugs known as sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Canaglifozin is indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes in conjunction with diet and exercise. The drug has been studied as monotherapy and in combination with other common treatments for type 2 diabetes including metformin, sulfonylurea, pioglitazone, and insulin.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

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CABG Highly Cost Effective In Diabetics With Multivessel Disease Reply

In November the main results of the FREEDOM trial showed that diabetics with multivessel disease do better with CABG than PCI. Now the findings of the trial’s cost-effectiveness study, published online in Circulation, demonstrate that CABG is also highly cost-effective when compared with PCI.

Elizabeth Magnuson and colleagues  found that although CABG initially cost nearly $9,000 more than PCI ($34,467 versus $25,845), over the long term it was more cost effective. At five years, greater follow-up costs in the PCI group, in large part due to a greater number of  repeat revascularization procedures, reduced the difference so that CABG cost only $3,600 more than PCI. The researchers calculated that CABG had a lifetime cost-effectiveness of $8,132 per QALY (quality-adjusted life-year) gained, which is considered highly cost effective. The finding was consistent across a broad range of assumptions.

The authors concluded “that CABG provides not only better long-term clinical outcomes than DES-PCI but that these benefits are achieved at an overall cost that represents an attractive use of societal health care resources. These findings suggest that existing guidelines that recommend CABG for diabetic patients with multivessel CAD remain appropriate in current practice and may provide additional support for strengthening those recommendations.”

“With great concerns about escalating healthcare costs, it’s very important when setting policy to understand the benefits gained from additional expenditures over the long run,” said Magnuson, in an AHA press release. “This is especially true in cardiovascular disease where many interventions tend to be very costly up front.”