Prolonged Dual Antiplatelet Therapy May Not Be Necessary For Second-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents Reply

The precise duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) following implantation of a drug-eluting stent (DES) has been the subject of considerable controversy. On the one hand, prolonged therapy may help prevent late stent thrombosis, which was particularly evident in first generation DESs. On the other hand, the risk of stent thrombosis may have diminished in newer generation drug-eluting stents, and prolonged DAPT  is associated with a greater risk for bleeding complications and additional expense and management issues.

In the Optimized Duration of Clopidogrel Therapy Following Treatment With the Zotarolimus-Eluting Stent in Real-World Clinical Practice (OPTIMIZE) trial 3,119 patients with stable CAD or a history of low-risk acute ACS who received a zotarolimus-eluting stent (Endeavor, Medtronic) were randomized to either short-term (3 months) or long-term (12 months)  DAPT. The results of OPTIMIZE were presented at TCT 2013 in San Francisco and published online in JAMA.

At one year there were no significant differences between the groups. The primary endpoint– the composite of death, MI, stroke, or major bleeding– occurred in 6% of patients in the short term group versus 5.8% of patients in the long-term group (risk difference 0.17, CI -1.52 – 1.86, p = 0.002 for noninferiority). Between 3 months and 1 year there was an identical 2.6% rate of events in both groups.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

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Study Supports Loosening Guidelines for Surgery After Stent Implantation Reply

According to current guidelines, noncardiac surgery should be delayed for six weeks after bare-metal stent (BMS) implantation and for one year after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation, though there is little good evidence to support these recommendations. Stent thrombosis caused by discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy in order to lower the risk of bleeding during surgery is the biggest concern. Now, a new study published in JAMA suggests that the guidelines may be over strict and that delays recommended after DES implantation are longer than warranted.

Mary T. Hawn and colleagues analyzed data from nearly 125,000 VA patients who received a stent between 2000 and 2010. Within this group more than 28,000 (22.5%) had a noncardiac operation within 2 years…

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Ohio Hospital And Cardiology Group Pay $4.4 Million To Settle Charges Over Unnecessary PCIs 2

In 2006, Reed Abelson in the New York Times reported that the PCI rate in Elyria, Ohio was four times the national average. Now, six-and-a-half years later, the local hospital and cardiology group have agreed to pay $4.4 million to settle US allegations “that the hospital and the physicians “performed angioplasty and stent placement procedures on patients who had heart disease but whose blood vessels were not sufficiently occluded to require the particular procedures at issue.”

The leader of the cardiology group defends its quality of care and says it “settled this matter so we can put it behind us and move forward.”

Read my complete story about this on Forbes.

CABG Highly Cost Effective In Diabetics With Multivessel Disease Reply

In November the main results of the FREEDOM trial showed that diabetics with multivessel disease do better with CABG than PCI. Now the findings of the trial’s cost-effectiveness study, published online in Circulation, demonstrate that CABG is also highly cost-effective when compared with PCI.

Elizabeth Magnuson and colleagues  found that although CABG initially cost nearly $9,000 more than PCI ($34,467 versus $25,845), over the long term it was more cost effective. At five years, greater follow-up costs in the PCI group, in large part due to a greater number of  repeat revascularization procedures, reduced the difference so that CABG cost only $3,600 more than PCI. The researchers calculated that CABG had a lifetime cost-effectiveness of $8,132 per QALY (quality-adjusted life-year) gained, which is considered highly cost effective. The finding was consistent across a broad range of assumptions.

The authors concluded “that CABG provides not only better long-term clinical outcomes than DES-PCI but that these benefits are achieved at an overall cost that represents an attractive use of societal health care resources. These findings suggest that existing guidelines that recommend CABG for diabetic patients with multivessel CAD remain appropriate in current practice and may provide additional support for strengthening those recommendations.”

“With great concerns about escalating healthcare costs, it’s very important when setting policy to understand the benefits gained from additional expenditures over the long run,” said Magnuson, in an AHA press release. “This is especially true in cardiovascular disease where many interventions tend to be very costly up front.”