European Regulators Investigate Cardiovascular Safety Of Ibuprofen Reply

The European Medicines Agency announced on Friday that it had initiated a review of the cardiovascular safety of ibuprofen when taken in high doses over  an extended period of time. The review will be performed by the Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC).

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

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Sharp Scrutiny From European Medicines Agency Of Amgen And Servier Heart Drug Reply

There may be trouble on the horizon for ivabradine, a heart drug marketed by Servier under the brand names of Corlentor and Procoralan. The drug is widely available in Europe and elsewhere, though it is not available in the US, where it is under development by Amgen. Although it hasn’t been widely noticed– I can find no other press reports– the European Medicines Agency said that it has started a review of the drug based on troubling findings from the SIGNIFY study. (Ivabradine is used to treat patients with long-term stable angina and long-term heart failure.)

The main results of SIGNIFY are scheduled to be presented on August 31 at the European Society of Cardiology meeting in Barcelona. But on May 8 the European Medicines Agency announced that it had initiated a review of ivabradine based on  preliminary results…

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

European Medicines Agency Starts Review of Combined Use Of Drugs That Block The Renin-Angiotensin System 1

The European Medicines Agency said last week that it was initiating a review of the combined use of agents that block the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The three classes of RAS-blocking drugs (ACE inhibitors, ARBs, and direct renin inhibitors) are used to treat hypertension and congestive heart failure.

The EMA said that the review was being performed to address concerns that combined RAS-blocking drugs could increase the risk for hyperkalemia, hypotension, and kidney failure when compared with a single agent.  A recent meta-analysis of 33 clinical studies published in the British Medical Journal concluded that “although dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin system may have seemingly beneficial effects on certain surrogate endpoints, it failed to reduce mortality and was associated with an excessive risk of adverse events… The risk to benefit ratio argues against the use of dual therapy.”

Franz Messerli, senior author of the BMJ meta-analysis, applauded the EMA action and said that “as usual the FDA is dragging its feet.”

Click here to read the full story on Forbes.

 

 

 

Pradaxa To Be Contraindicated In Patients With Mechanical Heart Valves 1

Boehringer Ingelheim is starting to inform physicians about a new contraindication for its oral anticoagulant drug Pradaxa (dabigatran). The company has told investigators in trials utilizing dabigatran that it will shortly be sending a “Dear Doctor Letter,” also known as a Direct Healthcare Professional Communication (DHPC), to healthcare professionals. The letter will inform physicians that Pradaxa is now contraindicated in patients with mechanical heart valves. The change was based on a recent decision of the FDA, BI told its investigators.

The FDA action follows a similar decision by the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicines Agency, which announced last week that it had recommended that Pradaxa be contraindicated in patients with prosthetic heart valves.

Both the FDA and the CHMP actions appear to be based on findings from the RE-ALIGN trial in patients with mechanical heart valves, which Boehringer Ingelheim announced last week had been stopped prematurely. (Click here for the CardioBrief story.As reported here in October, the company had previously terminated one arm of the study after an interim review of the data by the trial’s Data Safety Monitoring Board

One cardiologist who is a dabigatran investigator told CardioBrief that the label change

is consistent with the findings in Re-Align, although I wish it were presented and published in a peer reviewed journal. I do understand the urgency on behalf of the FDA to ensure that the use does not stray beyond its labeling for A-fib given both the prospective, randomized data from Re-Align and case reports of strokes on Pradaxa with mechanical valves. I don’t think this is the final word on Pradaxa (or other new generation anticoagulants), but if we are to use them, the doses will undoubtedly be different, and presumably higher, than the doses used for A-fib. The question is whether one can find a dose that prevents thromboembolic strokes with the new generation anticoagulants at an acceptable level of bleeding. It’s also worth noting that they did not recommend Pradaxa in patients with bioprosthetic valves, but didn’t absolutely contraindicate it. Yet.