No, An Apple Device Won’t Tell You If You’re Having A Heart Attack 2

No one knows for sure but Apple appears to be strongly interested in adding medical applications and technologies to its current and future products. We know that Apple has patented a heart sensor that could be incorporated in a future iPhone or iWatch, though it seems more likely that it would be used for security rather than health purposes. We also know that top Apple executives have met with FDA commissioner Margaret Hamburg and top FDA device regulators, though the details of their discussion have not been disclosed.

But one new report on SF Gate is almost certainly wrong: an Apple device won’t be able to tell you if you’re about to have a heart attack.

 Apple is exploring ways to measure noise “turbulence” as it applies to blood flow. The company wants to develop software and sensors that can predict heart attacks by identifying the sound blood makes as it tries to move through an artery clogged with plaque, the source said.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

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Apple Patent Could Add Heart Sensor To iPhones 1

On Christmas Eve the US Patent Office dropped a present down Apple’s chimney: a patent for a “seamlessly embedded heart rate monitor” that might one day allow an iPhone to identify and authenticate a user through the unique signature of the heart’s electrocardiogram (ECG).

 

Click here to read the full story on Forbes.

 

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Instagram for Heart Attacks: iPhone App Speeds ECG Transmission To Hospital Reply

In the crucial early stages of a possible heart attack, EMTs on the scene now rely on slow and unreliable proprietary technology to transmit vital ECG data to physicians at a hospital for evaluation. But a new iPhone app using standard cell phone networks may help speed the process and, ultimately,  cut delays in treatment for heart attack patients.

In a presentation earlier today at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2013 meeting in Baltimore, faculty and students at the University of Virginia designed an iPhone app to overcome some of the limitations of the current system. The iPhone app takes a photo of the ECG, reduces its size, and transmits the image over a standard cell phone network to a secure server. The image can then be viewed at the receiving hospital by physicians qualified to read an ECG.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

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What’s Next for the iPhone ECG Following Regulatory Clearance? 2

from Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry:

What’s Next for the iPhone ECG Following Regulatory Clearance?

 The user base and functionality of mobile ECG technology is set to expand.

“After recently winning FDA clearance and CE Mark certification, the iPhone ECG from AliveCor (San Francisco, CA), is poised to kickstart a disruption of the traditional ECG market.”

….

“In November 2011, Topol used the device to diagnose a myocardial infarction while on a plane en route from Virginia to San Diego. The plane made an emergency landing and the patient survived the ordeal.”

Click here for the entire article from Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry.