Encouraging Long Term Results For Less Invasive Heart Valves Reply

The publications five years ago of the two part PARTNER trial brought a major change in the treatment options available to some people with aortic valve disease, which is often an extremely serious condition with a poor prognosis. The trial demonstrated that transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) was a reasonable treatment option, first for patients who were not surgical candidates and then for patients who were at high risk for surgery. One important lingering concern about TAVR was whether its results would prove to be sufficiently durable. Now the final 5 year findings from the trial, published in two papers in the Lancet, provide strong reassurance regarding the durability of TAVR. (The PARTNER trial used the Sapien TAVR device from Edwards Lifesciences. Current TAVR devices are made by Edwards and Medtronic.)

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

High Risks And Rewards Found With Heart Valve Device From Edwards And Medtronic Reply

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is one of the most important advances in cardiovascular medicine in recent years. TAVR devices, introduced recently in the US by Edwards Lifesciences and Medtronic, are associated with very high risks, but offer a less invasive alternative to traditional aortic valve replacement surgery. Because of early concerns about potential overuse and misuse of TAVR, many observers have been eagerly awaiting information about its use in the real world.

Now a new report published in JAMA offers the best perspective yet on the introduction of TAVR in the US with an analysis of  the one year outcomes of the first group of patients who underwent the procedure.

Click here to read the full post, with comments from Sanjay Kaul and Ajay Kirtane.

Medtronic And Boston Scientific Plan To Resume Blood Pressure Trials This Year Reply

Medtronic and Boston Scientific have announced plans to start phase 2 clinical trials this year for their updated renal denervation catheters. The once promising new technology is intended to treat hypertension unresponsive to drug therapy. The failure last year of Medtronic’s Symplicity HTN-3, the first large pivotal trial to rigorously test renal denervation, sent manufacturers back to their drawing boards to redesign the devices.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Three Trials Show Benefits Of Thrombectomy In Stroke Patients Reply

Three new studies offer important additional evidence that early treatment with current thrombectomy devices that extract clots from blood vessels in the brain can lead to improved outcomes in carefully selected stroke patients. The trials were stopped early based on efficacy following positive findings last year from another trial, MR CLEAN. The three new trials were presented today at the AHA/ASA International Stroke Conference in Nashville; two of the trials were published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

FDA Approves New Medtronic Drug-Coated Balloon To Open Blocked Leg Arteries Reply

Medtronic said today that it had received approval from the FDA to market its In.Pact Admiral drug-coated balloon (DCB) to treat peripheral artery disease (PAD) in the upper leg. The device is the second DCB to gain FDA approval. Last October the FDA approved CR Bard’s Lutonix DCB for a similar indication.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

MDT DCB

FDA Approves Second Generation Heart Valve From Edwards Lifesciences Reply

The next phase of the burgeoning and rapidly maturing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) market has begun. Edwards Lifesciences announced on Monday afternoon that the FDA had approved its second generation Sapien XT TAVR device  for the treatment of high-risk and inoperable patients suffering from severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS).

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

The Walking Dead: Renal Denervation In Europe Just Can’t Be Stopped Reply

Earlier this year the only large, well-designed trial of renal denervation– the once highly-promising catheter-based technology that was widely expected to “cure” difficult cases of resistant hypertension– failed spectacularly. Many hypertension experts believe that ultimately the technique will prove to be beneficial, but after the failure of Simplicity HTN-3 it is clear that there’s a great deal of research that needs to be performed to find out just how– or if– this novel technology should be used.

In the US this does not present a problem. The FDA has not approved renal denervation so it can only be used in a research setting. But that is not the case in Europe, where the device is available due to lower standards for device approval.

Right now Europe’s largest interventional cardiology meeting, Euro PCR, is underway in Paris. Surprisingly– or perhaps not– renal denervation is still being heavily promoted in Europe. Here is the evidence: a series of tweets by @Jeddacath, an interventional cardiologist who trained at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital in Boston and who is attending the meeting.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Walking Dead

Medtronic To Pay Over $1Billion To Settle Patent Litigation With Edwards Lifesciences Reply

After years of protracted and often bitter litigation in the US and abroad, Edwards Lifesciences and Medtronic today announced a broad resolution to all their patent disputes over transcatheter heart valves.

Medtronic will pay more than a billion dollars over the course of the agreement, which lasts until April 2022.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Will Edwards Snatch Defeat From The Jaws Of Its Victory Over Medtronic? Reply

On the heels of a sweeping victory in the courts over its rival MedtronicEdwards Lifesciences is poised to dominate the TAVR (transcatheter aortic valve replacement) market– the revolutionary new catheter technology that offers some patients with life-threatening aortic valve disease an alternative to chest-splitting surgery. Although the legal wrangling is not quite over– Medtronic is appealing the decision and has requested that enforcement of the injunction be postponed– it appears likely that Edwards will ultimately achieve a broad legal and business victory.

But Edwards’ unprecedented victory also presents an unprecedented challenge to the company. While the court appears to have given Edwards everything it wished, the ultimate result could produce significant harm to Edwards’ relationship to the interventional cardiologists who are its core customers. More importantly, there is now a distinct possibility that at least for several years many people who could possibly benefit from the Medtronic technology will not be able to get it.

A Decisive Victory

In last week’s ruling a federal judge delivered a broad ruling in favor of Edwards:

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

New Medtronic Heart Valve Threatened By Court Decision Reply

A legal injunction may severely limit the availability in the United States of Medtronic’s CoreValve device, which only received FDA approval earlier this year. The device received abundant praise recently when a large clinical trial demonstrated substantial advantages for CoreValve over traditional open-heart surgery.

The injunction is the latest episode in an ongoing patent war in which Edwards Lifesciences, which pioneered the field of transcatheter aortic valve replacement with its Sapien devices, has sought to hinder Medtronic from competing in the US and international markets.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

The Uncertain Future Of A Once Highly Promising Device For Lowering Blood Pressure Reply

Following the spectacular crash and burn of the Symplicity HTN-3 trial at the American College of Cardiology two weeks ago, the future of renal denervation (RDN)– the once highly promising catheter technology that many thought would cure resistant hypertension– appears in doubt.

Although the device has not been approved in the US– and will not be approved without further clinical trials– in Europe and other places it remains on the market. So the questions about the technology’s future revolve around the future direction of research in the field and how the existing renal denervation market will be affected by the trial results.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Survival Advantage for TAVR Over Surgery in High-Risk Patients Reply

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), which has been slowly and cautiously entering the clinical arena, will probably get a big boost from a new trial showing a significant mortality advtange for TAVR over traditional surgery.

Results from the U.S. CoreValve High-Risk Study were presented at the American College of Cardiology in Washington, DC, and published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

 

No Benefit Found in First Real Test of Renal Denervation Reply

SYMPLICITY HTN-3, the eagerly awaited first rigorous test of renal denervation, shows that the real effect of the novel blood-pressure-lowering technology is dramatically lower than earlier expectations, which had been fueled by data from previous uncontrolled trials. Results of SYMPLICITY HTN-3 were presented at the American College of Cardiology conference in Washington, DC, and published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Pivotal Medtronic Trial For ‘Breakthrough’ Blood Pressure Device Goes Down The Tubes Reply

The hypertension community woke up this morning to a large dose of reality with an announcement by Medtronic that the novel SYMPLICITY HTN-3 trial of its much-anticipated  renal denervation device had failed to meet its primary efficacy endpoint. Renal denervation has been widely touted as a breakthrough product that could dramatically lower blood pressure by as much as 30 mm Hg, allowing physicians to cure the most severe form of high blood pressure, resistant hypertension.

“SYMPLICITY HTN-3 met its primary safety endpoint related to the incidence of major adverse events one month following randomization and renal artery stenosis to six months,” said Deepak Bhatt, the co-principal investigator of the trial, in the Medtronic press release. “Importantly, however, the trial did not meet its primary efficacy endpoint.”

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Stents Lose In Comparisons With Surgery And Medical Therapy Reply

Despite the enormous increase in the use of stents in recent decades, there is little or no good evidence comparing their use to the alternatives of CABG surgery or optimal medical therapy in patients also eligible for these strategies. Now two new meta-analyses published in JAMA Internal Medicine provide new evidence that the alternatives to PCI remain attractive and that some of the growth in PCI may have been unwarranted.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Prolonged Dual Antiplatelet Therapy May Not Be Necessary For Second-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents Reply

The precise duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) following implantation of a drug-eluting stent (DES) has been the subject of considerable controversy. On the one hand, prolonged therapy may help prevent late stent thrombosis, which was particularly evident in first generation DESs. On the other hand, the risk of stent thrombosis may have diminished in newer generation drug-eluting stents, and prolonged DAPT  is associated with a greater risk for bleeding complications and additional expense and management issues.

In the Optimized Duration of Clopidogrel Therapy Following Treatment With the Zotarolimus-Eluting Stent in Real-World Clinical Practice (OPTIMIZE) trial 3,119 patients with stable CAD or a history of low-risk acute ACS who received a zotarolimus-eluting stent (Endeavor, Medtronic) were randomized to either short-term (3 months) or long-term (12 months)  DAPT. The results of OPTIMIZE were presented at TCT 2013 in San Francisco and published online in JAMA.

At one year there were no significant differences between the groups. The primary endpoint– the composite of death, MI, stroke, or major bleeding– occurred in 6% of patients in the short term group versus 5.8% of patients in the long-term group (risk difference 0.17, CI -1.52 – 1.86, p = 0.002 for noninferiority). Between 3 months and 1 year there was an identical 2.6% rate of events in both groups.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Pivotal Results For Medtronic’s CoreValve Reply

Key data on what will likely be the second transcatheter aortic valve to gain approval in the US were presented today at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2013 Conference in San Francisco. Jeffrey Popma, co-principal investigator of the Trial, presented the major results from the CoreValve U.S. Pivotal Trial in patients who were too ill or frail for traditional open heart surgery.

In an as-treated analysis of 471 patients (the intention-to-treat population was 487), the primary endpoint– the rate of death or major stroke at one year– was 25.5% (CI 21.6-29.4). This was 40.7% lower than the prespecified performance goal of 43% (p<0.0001) based on historical standards.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

 

FDA Approves First New Atherectomy Device In 20 Years Reply

The FDA today granted PMA approval to the Diamondback 360 Coronary Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS) for the treatment of severely calcified coronary arteries. Cardiovascular Systems, the manufacturer of the device, said that the OAS  was the first new coronary atherectomy system to receive FDA approval in 2 decades. The company said  it would begin a controlled launch of the device immediately, focusing initially on “a limited number of the top medical institutions in the United States.”

In separate news, Medtronic yesterday announced the launch of its Export Advance aspiration catheter for coronary thrombus removal. The device was recently approved by the FDA. The company said the device features a pre-loaded stylet that “increases the deliverability and kink resistance of the new device while traversing the vasculature to reach the aspiration site.”

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

Realistic Expectations For New ‘Breakthrough’ Blood Pressure Technology Reply

Early trials of renal denervation, the innovative new catheter-based blood pressure lowering technology,  have resulted in extremely impressive drops in systolic blood pressure in the range of 30 mm Hg. These results have sparked a great deal of excitement in the hypertension community and stirred the interest of a multitude of medical device companies. Some experts have proclaimed renal denervation a potential “cure” for resistant hypertension, perhaps enabling a significant number of patients to eliminate all drug therapy. Other expanded uses of the technology in more moderate forms of hypertension and other diseases are under active consideration. Now, however, a new analysis of the available data suggests the troubling possibility that renal denervation may not be nearly as effective in cutting blood pressure as had been suggested in the earlier trials. Rather than reducing systolic blood pressure by 30 mm hg, the new analysis suggests that a more realistic estimate of the effect of renal denervation may be a much more modest reduction of about 11 mm Hg.

A paper published online in Heart  demonstrates that the large reductions in blood pressure seen so far in clinical trials of renal denervation may be a consequence of certain key aspects in the design of these trials. The apparent blood pressure lowering effect of renal denervation has been greatly magnified because the trials have been uncontrolled, unblinded, and have utilized office-based blood pressure measurements rather than the far more reliable and consistent ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM).

Click here to read the full story on Forbes.

Medtronic Faces Removal Of CoreValve Transcatheter Heart Valve From German Market Reply

In the wake of a major patent decision, Medtronic will be forced to remove its CoreValve transcatheter heart valve from the German market. Edwards Lifesciences said today that a German Court had found that Medtronic infringed a key patent, known as the Spenser patent, and granted an injunction prohibiting the sale of CoreValve and CoreValve Evolut systems in Germany.

Medtronic said it would appeal the decision and said the action “will limit options for physicians and their patients who need transcatheter aortic valve procedures, which Medtronic believes is contrary to sound health policy.”

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

I

BLOCK HF: CRT Superior To Conventional Pacing In Heart Failure Patients With AV Block Reply

 

Patients with atrioventricular (AV) block generally receive right ventricular pacing; cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been restricted to patients with a low ejection fraction and a wide QRS duration. However, RV pacing may worsen LV dysfunction in AV block patients with low ejection fractions. Previous studies have raised the possibility that these patients may benefit from biventricular pacing with a CRT device.

Now, results from the Medtronic-sponsored BLOCK HF (Biventricular versus Right Ventricular Pacing in Heart Failure Patients with Atrioventricular Block) trial, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, lend more support for the expansion of CRT devices into this population. Anne Curtis and colleagues randomized 691 patients to standard RV pacing or  biventricular pacing. After 37 months of followup, a primary outcome event– death, urgent care visit for heart failure that required intravenous therapy, or a 15% or more increase in the LV end-systolic volume index– occurred in 55.6% of the RV pacing group versus 45.8% in the biventricular pacing group (HR 0.74, CI 0.60-0.90).

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Anne Curtis

 

 

 

 

Guest Post: Case Report Of Durata Lead Failure Raises Fresh Concerns Reply

Editor’s Note: The following guest post is published with the permission of its author,  Edward J. Schloss, MD, (Twitter ID @EJSMD) the medical director of cardiac electrophysiology at Christ Hospital in Cincinnati, OH.

Case Report Of Durata Lead Failure Raises Fresh Concerns

by Edward J. Schloss, MD

 A case report of a failed St. Jude Medical Durata ICD lead was published yesterday, raising suspicions that this lead may share some of the same potential failure mechanisms of its troubled predecessor, the Riata lead.

St. Jude’s ICD lead troubles date back to early case reports involving the Riata and Riata ST leads that ultimately led to FDA recall in December 2011.  These leads have since been well documented to be subject both to increased electrical failures and structural breakdown of the lead as has been previously reported.

St. Jude’s Durata lead was designed as a successor to the Riata ST lead and continues to be marketed and implanted.  The Durata lead shared a similar design to the predecessor Riata ST lead with the most notable difference being the addition of a outer coating made of the proprietary co-polymer Optim.  This design modification has been promoted to improve abrasion resistance.  It is hoped that this modification, would prevent the most prominent failure mechanism of the Riata family, inside-out abrasion and cable externalization.
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FDA Issues Warning Letter To CoreValve Investigator Reply

The FDA has issued a warning letter to an investigator in the Medtronic CoreValve US Pivotal Trial. The letter cites numerous serious violations relating to the treatment of subjects in the trial testing the experimental Medtronic TAVI (transcatheter aortic valve implantation) device. The violations were uncovered during an FDA inspection last summer.

The subject of the FDA warning is Michael Ring, one of the two principal investigators of the CoreValve trial at the Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center site in Spokane, WA.

Click here to read the full story on Forbes. (Updated to include an additional comment from Dr. Ring.)

English: A warning sign with an exclamation mark

Small Study Explores Expanded Use For TAVI In Native Valve Aortic Regurgitation Reply

As transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) gains increasing acceptance, cardiologists and surgeons are exploring additional patient populations who may benefit from the procedure. A new paper in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology provides the first look at the use of TAVI in the small but important group of patients with pure, severe native aortic valve regurgitation (NAVR) who do not have aortic stenosis.

The authors acknowledge that TAVI will likely be used sparingly in the NAVR population:

…although these results are encouraging for those patients who are truly ineligible for surgery, surgical valve replacement remains the gold standard for those who can undergo it, even at high risk. Furthermore, there is an increasing number of patients in whom the native aortic valve can be preserved during surgery.

Click here to read the full story on Forbes.