SPRINT: More Controversy And Confusion About ‘Landmark’ Trial

–Blood pressure experts raise new questions and concerns about the controversial trial. More questions and concerns are being raised about SPRINT, the NIH’s “landmark” blood pressure lowering trial. In sharp contrast to the enormous amount of initial hype, many hypertension experts are now saying that the SPRINT trial is difficult to interpret and can’t be readily…

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Waiting For ISCHEMIA: Why Won’t Cardiologists Enroll Patients?

One of the most important unanswered questions in medicine today– the best treatment for stable ischemic heart disease– may never get a satisfactory answer because cardiologists are unwilling to enter their patients in a clinical trial. One major reason why the question is urgent: about a third of the 1 million PCI procedures performed each year in the…

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Coming Attraction: Looking Forward To SPRINT At The AHA Next Month

Back in September the NIH tantalized the medical community with a preliminary announcement of the results of a major clinical trial, SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial). The NIH said SPRINT was a “landmark trial” that could “save lives,” but their claims were impossible to evaluate since they only gave the slightest hint of the actual results. On November…

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Heart Failure Experts SPRINT To An Early Finish

According to a recent news report a group of prominent heart failure doctors  have eagerly embraced a lower blood pressure target of 120 mm Hg for heart failure patients based on the preliminary results of the SPRINT trial announced last month. But another equally prominent heart failure doctor says that it is far too early to…

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SPRINT Trial To Be Presented At The American Heart Association Meeting In November

Update: I have now received confirmation that SPRINT will be presented on Monday, November 9 at 2 PM. The SPRINT trial, which provoked a storm of excitement and controversy a few weeks ago, will be presented in November at the American Heart Association meeting in Orlando. The trial is not currently on the list of late-breaking clinical trials but…

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Second Trial Of Controversial Chelation Therapy Gains Crucial Early Support

The National Institutes of Health is giving money to support the planning of a second trial to test the potential role of chelation therapy in treating patients with myocardial infarction. The first Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy (TACT) was extremely controversial. It was funded by the NIH more than a dozen ago as part of an initiative to…

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NIH Trial, Stopped Early, Supports More Intensive Blood Pressure Targets

More stringent blood pressure targets could save lives and reduce cardiovascular events, according to preliminary results from a large NIH clinical trial that was stopped early. The SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) trial randomized 9,361 hypertensive patients 50 years of age or older to the standard systolic blood pressure target (when the trial began) of 140…

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US Proposal Would Greatly Expand Transparency Of Clinical Trials

The US Department of Health and Human Services today proposed new rules that would greatly expand the number of clinical trials that companies and researchers are required to report. … Click here to read the full post on Forbes.    …

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Controversial NIH Chelation Trial Published In JAMA

Final results of the troubled NIH-sponsored TACT trial testing chelation therapy for coronary disease have now been published in JAMA. Last November, when the preliminary results were presented at the American Heart Association meeting, the positive finding in favor of chelation therapy surprised many observers, though the investigators and senior AHA representatives expressed considerable caution  about the proper…

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