Boehringer Ingelheim’s Pradaxa Gains New Indication 1

The new oral anticoagulants continue to gain additional indications from the FDA. Earlier today Boehringer Ingelheim announced that the FDA had approved Pradaxa (dabigatran) for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes both deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE).

 Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

 

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Apixaban Gains Indication For DVT Prophylaxis After Knee And Hip Replacement Surgery Reply

The FDA has approved a new indication for apixaban (Eliquis), the anticoagulant drug manufactured by Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer. The new indication is for the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients who have undergone hip or knee replacement surgery. DVT can lead to the life-threatening condition of pulmonary embolism (PE). The DVT prophylaxis indication joins the previously approved indication of stroke prevention in patients who have nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

Click here to read the entire post on Forbes.

 

Problems Persist Despite Gains In Oral Anticoagulant Use Reply

Although significant progress has been made in recent years, a new survey from the European Society of Cardiology finds that there are still too many atrial fibrillation patients who are not taking the best medications to reduce their elevated risk of stroke. Many elderly patients are not receiving oral anticoagulants and overall too many patients are still taking aspirin, despite the fact that it is not recommended for this group of patients.

In a paper published in the American Journal of Medicine, Gregory YH Lip and colleagues analyzed data from more than 3,100 patients surveyed in the Euro Observational Research Programme on Atrial Fibrillation from February 2012 to March 2013.

Click here to read the entire post on Forbes.

 

FDA Again Rejects ACS Indication for Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) Reply

For the second time the FDA has turned down the supplemental new drug application (NDA) for the proposed indication of rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Johnson & Johnson) to treat patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

In a new press release issues on Monday afternoon, the company restated its confidence “in the robustness and results of the ATLAS ACS 2 TIMI 51 trial.” Criticism of ATLAS from the FDA and the advisory panel members had focused on missing data from the ATLAS trial. In today’s press release J&J provided more information about its efforts to address this question:

Click here for the complete story on Forbes.

Longer Warfarin Therapy After Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Replacement May Be Beneficial Reply

Three months of warfarin is the usual standard of care following bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement (AVR),  although the supporting evidence base for this practice is limited. Now a large new registry study published in JAMA suggests that more prolonged warfarin therapy may be beneficial.

Danish researchers identified 4,075 patients who underwent bioprosthetic AVR. As expected, warfarin treatment between 30 and 90 days after AVR was associated with significant reductions in stroke, thromboembolic events and cardiovascular deaths compared with patients not taking warfarin. The benefits continued between 3 and 6 months, though the reduction in stroke was no longer statistically significant. The authors calculated that for every 23  patients not being treated with warfarin between 3 and 6 months, there was one additional cardiovascular death, at a cost of 1 bleeding complication requiring hospital admission for every 74 patients.

“With no randomized trials to guide the length of warfarin treatment, our results call for a review of guidelines in the field to consider an extension of the treatment to 6 months after surgery, especially in patients with an increased risk of cardiovascular death,” the authors wrote.

In an accompanying editorial, Shamir Mehta and Jeffrey Weitz write that, despite the limitations of an observational study, the results support a change in clinical practice in favor of prolonged warfarin therapy for as long as 6 months. They observe that the trial does not provide information about the possible role for the newer oral anticoagulants or about the role of adjunctive aspirin.

Here is the press release from JAMA:

Anticoagulation Treatment For Longer Than Three Months After Aortic Valve Replacement Associated With Decreased Risk of Cardiovascular Death

 CHICAGO – Although current guidelines recommend 3 months of anticoagulation treatment after bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement surgery, a study that included more than 4,000 patients found that patients who had warfarin therapy continued between 3 and 6 months after surgery had a lower rate of cardiovascular death, according to a study in the November 28 issue of JAMA.

“Biological prostheses are preferred to mechanical valves for aortic valve replacement (AVR) surgery in elderly patients older than 65 years because of shorter life expectancy and lack of a need to use anticoagulation treatment in the long-term. Especially in these patients, the tradeoff between thromboembolic complications due to the valve implant and bleeding events as adverse effects from anticoagulation therapy must be balanced. Nevertheless, appropriate duration of anticoagulation treatment postoperatively is yet to be established because the risk of complications when the treatment is discontinued is unknown,” according to background information in the article. The current recommendation of 3 months of warfarin treatment after bioprosthetic AVR surgery is primarily based on results from 1 retrospective study with a limited number of events.

Charlotte Merie, M.D., of the Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Copenhagen, Denmark and colleagues investigated whether discontinuation of warfarin treatment within prespecified periods after bioprosthetic AVR surgery was associated with increased risk of thromboembolic complications, cardiovascular death, and bleeding incidents. Through a search in the Danish National Patient Registry, 4,075 patients were identified who had bioprosthetic AVR surgery performed between January 1997 and December 2009. The researchers determined the incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of strokes, thromboembolic events, cardiovascular deaths, and bleeding incidents by discontinuing warfarin as opposed to continued treatment at 30 to 89 days, 90 to 179 days, 180 to 364 days, 365 to 729 days, and at least 730 days after surgery. Average age of the patients was 75 years; 41 percent were women.

Overall, 361 patients (8.9 percent) experienced a stroke, 615 (15.1 percent) had a thromboembolic event, and 364 (8.9 percent) encountered a bleeding incident after the date of surgery. During the observation period, 1,156 patients (28.4 percent) died, with 879 (76.0 percent) of these deaths related to cardiovascular disease. The IRRs for patients not treated with warfarin compared with those treated with warfarin were 2.46 for stroke; 2.93 for thromboembolic events; 2.32 for bleeding incidents; and 7.61for cardiovascular deaths within 30 to 89 days after surgery; and 3.51 for cardiovascular deaths within 90 to 179 days after surgery.

“Our study demonstrates that discontinuing warfarin therapy within the first 3 months after surgery is associated with a significant increase in the risk of stroke, thromboembolic complications, and cardiovascular death. The novelty of our study is the finding that discontinuing warfarin therapy within 90 to 179 days after surgery is associated with a significant increase in the risk of cardiovascular death,” the authors write.

“International guidelines on anticoagulation after a bioprosthetic AVR have been written with limited data on the appropriate duration of warfarin treatment after surgery. Consequently, our study challenges current guidelines on the duration of antithrombotic treatment after AVR surgery with biological valves by presenting results suggesting that these patients will gain from an additional 3 months of warfarin treatment in terms of reduced cardiovascular death without risking a significant increase in bleeding events.”

(JAMA. 2012;308(20):2097-2107)

Editor’s Note: This work was supported by the Research Fund of the Department of Cardiology at Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Gentofte, Denmark. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, etc.

“Dramatic” Increase In Bleeding Accompanies Addition Of Oral Anticoagulant Therapy In ACS Reply

The newer oral anticoagulants may help reduce ischemic events after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), but only at the cost of a “dramatic” increase in bleeding complications, according to a new meta-analysis published in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Hungarian researchers performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of seven trials in which 31,286 ACS patients were randomized to placebo or a new oral anticoagulant, either an anti-Xa or direct thrombin inhibitor. All patients also received antiplatelet therapy. Here are the odds ratios for bleeding events and important clinical endpoints with the newer agents:

  • TIMI major bleeding events: OR 3.03 (2.20-4.16)
  • Overall mortality: OR 0.90 (0.76-1.06)
  • Composite ischemic events: OR 0.86 (0.79-0.94)
  • Stent thrombosis (definite or probable): OR 0.73 (0.54-0.98)

“These results suggest that the unrestricted use of new-generation oral anticoagulant agents as an adjunct to dual antiplatelet therapy after an ACS cannot be recommended,” the authors concluded. However, they left open the possibility that the newer oral anticoagulants may be beneficial in the 6%-21% of ACS patients who require long-term anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation and other conditions.

In an accompanying comment, Adrian Hernandez writes that “the conclusions of the meta-analysis seem to be robust.” He points out that the large differences in the relative risk of bleeding and clinical events found in the meta-analysis translate into smaller differences in absolute risk. Nevertheless, he writes, “the benefit is largely canceled by the harm; therefore, the routine use of [novel oral anticoagulants] among patients with ACS is unwarranted.”

 

Apixaban (Eliquis) For Atrial Fibrillation Gets Positive European Recommendation 2

The European Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has recommended approval for apixaban (Eliquis, Pfizer and BristolMyers Squibb) for atrial fibrillation (AF). The drug is already approved in Europe for the prevention of venous thromboembolic events (VTE) following hip or knee replacement surgery. The drug has not yet been approved in the United States.

Here is the CHMP proposed indication for the existing 2.5 mg dose and a new 5 mg dose:

“Prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in adult patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), with one or more risk factors, such as prior stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA); age ≥ 75 years; hypertension; diabetes mellitus; symptomatic heart failure (NYHA Class ≥ II).”

CHMP proposed that apixaban should be contraindicated in patients at high risk for major bleeding and in patients receiving other anticoagulants.

The CHMP decision was based on data from the ARISTOTLE and AVERROES pivotal clinical trials.

Click here to download the PDF of the CHMP summary of opinion.

Click here to read the press release from Pfizer and BMS…

FDA Once Again Delays Approval Of Apixaban (Eliquis) 2

The FDA has once again delayed approval of apixaban (Eliquis), the much-anticipated oral anticoagulant. Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer announced today that it had received a a Complete Response Letter (CRL) to the New Drug Application (NDA) for the drug for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

The two companies reported that the FDA had asked for “additional information on data management and verification from the ARISTOTLE trial”  No new trials were requested by the FDA, according to the companies, who said they “will work closely with the FDA on the appropriate next steps” for the NDA.

Following the widely praised publication and presentation of ARISTOTLE, it was widely anticipated that apixaban would sail through the FDA approval process. This view gained early confirmation when the FDA granted priority review for the NDA last November, but the picture grew cloudier earlier this year when the FDA extended the action date by three months.

Wall Street analyst Tim Anderson speculated that apixaban might still gain FDA approval in 2012, though firm predictions are difficult since Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer have not released details about the questions raised by the FDA in the CRL.

Click here to read the press release from Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer

FDA Rejects ACS Indication for Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) 2

The FDA has issued a complete response letter to the supplemental new drug application (NDA) for the proposed indication of rivaroxaban (Xarelto, Johnson & Johnson) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The action was expected, since last month the FDA’s Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee voted against recommending the new indication, which was based on the pivotal ATLAS ACS 2-TIMI 51 trial.

In a press release a J&J company official said the company remains “confident in the robust results of the ATLAS ACS 2 TIMI 51 trial and the positive benefit-risk profile of rivaroxaban in patients with ACS. We will continue to work with the FDA to fully address their questions as quickly as possible.” Rivaroxaban is currently approved for the prevention of clots following knee replacement and hip replacement surgery and for the prevention of strokes and blood clots in people with atrial fibrillation.

Click here to read the press release from J&J…

FDA Grants Priority Review to Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) for ACS Patients Reply

The FDA has granted a priority review for the supplemental new drug application (sNDA) for rivaroxaban (Xarelto) in combination with standard therapy to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. The news was announced by Bayer and Johnson & Johnson. The FDA will now be required to respond within 6 months instead of 10 months to the December 29 submission of the sNDA.

The application is based upon the results of the ATLAS ACS 2-TIMI 51 study, which was the first trial to show a benefit in ACS with an anticoagulant. Previous trials testing anticoagulants in the setting of ACS had all failed. One key difference highlighted by many experts was the low doses of rivaroxaban used in the trial. The addition of 2.5 mg bid of rivaroxaban to standard therapy resulted in a significant reduction in the combined rate of cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke, as well as a significant reduction in death from cardiovascular causes (2.7% vs. 4.1%, p=0.002) and all-cause mortality (2.9% vs. 4.5%, p=0.002). The last two benefits were not found with the higher dose of rivaroxaban (5 mg bid) also studied in the trial. Rivaroxaban also caused significant increases in bleeding complications, but not fatal bleeding.

Priority reviews are granted to treatments that offer an advance in care or that provide a treatment where no adequate therapy exists, the company said.

Click here to read the press release from Bayer…

Guest Post: Industry Sponsored Editorial Assistance 4

Editor’s Note: The following guest post by Tom Yates is reprinted with permission from his blog Sick Populations. Yates is a UK-based physician with an interest in epidemiology and population health.

Industry Sponsored Editorial Assistance

by Tom Yates

The September 2011 edition of the Quarterly Journal of Medicine contained two review articles which dealt with the use of new oral anticoagulants in patients withatrial fibrillation.

The first was by Prof Richard Hobbs and Isabelle Leach, who works for a reputable sounding organisation called Chameleon Communications. The funding and conflict of interest statements read as follows.

F.D.R.H. received no funding for this work. Bayer AG and Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, LLC, through funding of the professional medical writing services provided by IL. The sponsors were not involved in writing or editing the material. The authors take full responsibility for all content…F.D.R.H. has received occasional speaker fees or sponsorship from a variety of pharmaceutical companies, some with interests in AF including Boehringer Ingelheim, Pfizer, and Bayer. I.L. is an employee of Chameleon Communications International which received funding from the sponsors for her time on this manuscript.

Bayer, who funded the editorial assistance, make Rivaroxaban, one of the drugs discussed in the article. Many of the companies from which Prof Hobbs has received money also make new oral anticoagulants. Chameleon Communications has been involved in preparing several other manuscripts in other journals on new anticoagulants over recent months.

The second, by Prof Joerg Kreuzer, was that edition’s “Editor’s Choice” article. Prof Kreuzer’s funding and conflict of interest statement read as follows.

This work was supported by Boehringer Ingelheim. The author was fully responsible for all content and editorial decisions. The author received no financial support or other compensation related to the development of the paper. Editorial support was funded by Boehringer Ingelheim…Conflict of interest: None declared… The authors would like to thank Rebecca Gardner of PAREXEL, UK, for editorial assistance in the preparation of this article.

Boehringer Ingelheim, make Dabigatran etexilate, a drug promoted in the article’s conclusion.

Concerned about these clear conflicts of interests, I wrote a letter to QJM arguing that the involvement of industry in the funding of review articles generates bias, probably above and beyond the mere choice of topics on which they focus. I requested answers to these four questions:
Click to continue reading…

Study Explores Role of Periprocedural Dabigatran in AF Ablation 1

Updated with a comment from John Mandrola– As dabigatran becomes more widely used in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, electrophysiologists are now trying to figure out how to handle anticoagulation in patients taking dabigatran (Pradaxa) for whom AF ablation is planned. In a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Dhanunjaya Lakkireddy and colleagues report on a multicenter, observational study of 290 patients who underwent an AF ablation procedure. Half the patients were taking periprocedural dabigatran and half were matched controls taking warfarin.

There were significantly more thromboembolic  and bleeding complications in the dabigatran group than in the warfarin group:
Click to continue reading…