Early Hint At Cardiovascular Outcomes With Sanofi’s and Regeneron’s Rapidly Advancing Cholesterol Drug Reply

Amid a slew of new data demonstrating yet again that PCSK9 inhibitors lower LDL cholesterol– drastically and in a wide variety of different patient populations– data from one trial offers the first suggestion that the drugs may in fact improve cardiovascular outcomes. But the analysis, the authors cautioned, is a post-hoc analysis of a trial neither designed nor powered to study outcomes, so should be considered preliminary and speculative at best.

Four phase 3 trials with the Sanofi and Regeneron PCSK9 inhibitor alirocumab (pronounced “allee rock you mab” by Chris Cannon at a news conference) were presented today at the European Society of Cardiology meeting in Barcelona.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

About these ads

FDA Sprinkles Some Rain On the PCSK9 Inhibitor Parade Reply

In the last few years the PCSK9 inhibitors have been one of the few bright lights in an otherwise dismal field of new cardiovascular drugs. Now the FDA is raising questions that could dramatically slow down the progress of these new cholesterol-lowering drugs.

Last month Regeneron disclosed that it had been “advised by the FDA that it has become aware of neurocognitive adverse events in the PCSK9 inhibitor class.”

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Slouching Toward Phase 3: Progress Report On New Cholesterol Drugs At The AHA Reply

The American Heart Association meeting in Dallas this year brought new phase 2 data about several promising new cholesterol drugs. But before jumping on any bandwagons it would be good to remember that even for the drugs most far along in development we still haven’t seen any phase 3 data. In addition, it bears repeating that the FDA may well be raising the entry bar for new cholesterol medications. As I wrote not too long ago, there is a good chance that the FDA will require completed outcomes studies for new cholesterol drugs. There’s good reason to be interested in these drugs but any predictions at this point would be hopelessly speculative.

One Year Results For Amgen’s PCSK-9 Inhibitor 

HDL Drug From CSL Limited

Esperion’s Novel Agent

Click here to read the full story on Forbes.

The Fate Of New Cholesterol Drugs Depends On IMPROVE-IT Reply

Prospects for the highly anticipated new class of cholesterol-lowering drugs, the PCSK9 inhibitors, took a wild roller coaster ride this week. The publication of new lipid guidelines by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology led many observers to think that the promising new drugs under development by Regeneron (in partnership with Sanofi), Amgen, and Pfizer might suffer significant delays.

The guidelines delivered a strong statement questioning the increasingly controversial theory that LDL lowering by itself is beneficial. “We found that non-statin therapies really didn’t provide an acceptable risk reduction benefit compared to their potential for adverse effects in the routine prevention of heart attack and stroke,” said the co-chair of the guideline. This led many observers to think that the FDA would likely require the developers of PCSK9 inhibitors to complete cardiovascular outcome trials before getting US approval. This decision would delay approval for several years.

Then, on Thursday, the companies developing PCSK9 inhibitors received some apparent good news. Bloomberg News reported that an FDA official said that the drugs “will only have to meet the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s existing standards for clearance, including whether they cut cholesterol and reduce blood pressure or inflammation.”

But then the FDA added one other very important caveat. Here’s how they phrased it to me:

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

PCSK9 Inhibitor Enhances Cholesterol-Lowering Effect Of Atorvastatin Reply

When added to low-dose atorvastatin a much-discussed new monoclonal antibody to PCSK9 significantly lowers cholesterol more effectively than atorvastatin alone, according to a phase 2 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Earlier this year, in March, the findings of three phase 1 trials demonstrating the cholesterol-lowering effects of the drug in healthy volunteers and in people with familial or nonfamilial hypercholesterolemia were also published in NEJM.

In the new trial, Eli Roth and colleagues studied 92 patients with LDL levels over 100 mg/dl despite taking atorvastatin 10 mg. Patients were then randomized to 8 weeks of treatment with 80 mg atorvastatin plus the PCSK9 inhibitor SAR236553, 10 mg atorvastatin plus SAR236553, or 80 mg atorvastatin alone. SAR236553 was administered as an injection once every 2 weeks. PCSK9 inhibition significantly improved LDL reduction:

Reduction in LDL cholesterol from baseline:

  • SAR236553 + atorvastatin 80 mg: 73.2% + 3.5
  • SAR236553 + atorvastatin 10 mg: 66.2% + 3.5
  • atorvastatin 80 mg: 17.3% + 3.5

The investigators reported that 100% of patients in the two groups that received SAR236553 achieved target LDL levels of less than 100 mg/dl, compared with only 52% who received atorvastatin 80 mg only.

The results, write the authors, suggest that SAR236553 “may benefit patients in whom LDL cholesterol has not been reduced to recommended levels, either because of an inadequate lipid-lowering response with high-dose statins alone or because of unacceptable side effects with high-dose statins.”

James Stein told CardioBrief:

“These results are very promising.    What we need now are larger studies of SAR236553 with a longer duration, to determine its safety and tolerability.  If it is safe and effectively lowers total and LDL cholesterol over long periods of time, it would be expected to reduce cardiovascular dissease risk, but of course outcomes studies eventually will be needed to prove that.”

In July the companies developing SAR236553, Sanofi and Regeneron, announced a large phase 3 program for the drug, including an 18,000-patient outcomes trial. Next Monday, at the American Heart Association scientific sessions, the results of two more phase 2 studies of SAR236553 will be presented, as well as a study with another PCSK9 monoclonal antibody from Pfizer, RN316 (PF-04950615).

Promising Phase 1 Results For New Monoclonal Antibody to PCSK9 Reply

Promising results from very early studies with an experimental new cholesterol-lowering drug, a monoclonal antibody to PCSK9, have been published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Evan Stein and colleagues report the results of two single-dose studies in which the drug, REGN727, was administered intravenously and subcutaneously to healthy subjects. In a third, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial, REGN727 was administered subcutaneously on days 1, 29, and 43 in adults with and without familial hypercholesterolemia (FH).

REGN727 was well tolerated and no subjects stopped taking the drug due to adverse events. Five patients had brief elevations in creatine kinase over three times the upper limit of normal. The drug had a powerful LDL-lowering effect: in the dose-ranging study in subjects already receiving atorvastatin

  • the 50 mg dose caused a 39% reduction of LDL cholesterol to 77.5 mg/dl,
  • the 100 mg dose caused a 53% reduction of LDL cholesterol to 61.3 mg/dl, and
  • the 150 mg dose caused a  61% reduction of LDL cholesterol to 53.8 mg/dl.

In an accompanying editorial, Stephen Young and Loren Fong write that “at this point, the status of PCSK9 therapeutics appears to be full speed ahead.” But they also express caution, noting that much work remains to be done:
Click to continue reading…