Stents Lose In Comparisons With Surgery And Medical Therapy Reply

Despite the enormous increase in the use of stents in recent decades, there is little or no good evidence comparing their use to the alternatives of CABG surgery or optimal medical therapy in patients also eligible for these strategies. Now two new meta-analyses published in JAMA Internal Medicine provide new evidence that the alternatives to PCI remain attractive and that some of the growth in PCI may have been unwarranted.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

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Dramatic Increase in Use of Radial Artery Access for PCI in the U.S. Reply

In the last six years interventional cardiologists have dramatically increased their use of radial access for PCI, according to a retrospective study published in Circulation. Using data from the CathPCI registry on more than 2.8 million procedures between January 2007 and September 2012, Dmitriy Feldman and colleagues found that radial access PCI increased 13-fold, from a negligible 1.2% at the beginning of the study to 16.1% at the end.

Click here to read the full story in Forbes.

 

Infographic from the American Heart Association

ESC Gives A Shot In the Arm To Radial Access For PCI Procedures: The New Default? Reply

Radial access is now the preferred approach for percutaneous coronary interventions, according to a consensus document from the European Society of Cardiology and other European organizations and published online in EuroIntervention. However, at least one prominent US interventional cardiologist thinks the “hard benefits” of radial access “are more controversial,” though he supports increased use of the newer approach.

Click here to read the full story on Forbes.

CABG Highly Cost Effective In Diabetics With Multivessel Disease Reply

In November the main results of the FREEDOM trial showed that diabetics with multivessel disease do better with CABG than PCI. Now the findings of the trial’s cost-effectiveness study, published online in Circulation, demonstrate that CABG is also highly cost-effective when compared with PCI.

Elizabeth Magnuson and colleagues  found that although CABG initially cost nearly $9,000 more than PCI ($34,467 versus $25,845), over the long term it was more cost effective. At five years, greater follow-up costs in the PCI group, in large part due to a greater number of  repeat revascularization procedures, reduced the difference so that CABG cost only $3,600 more than PCI. The researchers calculated that CABG had a lifetime cost-effectiveness of $8,132 per QALY (quality-adjusted life-year) gained, which is considered highly cost effective. The finding was consistent across a broad range of assumptions.

The authors concluded “that CABG provides not only better long-term clinical outcomes than DES-PCI but that these benefits are achieved at an overall cost that represents an attractive use of societal health care resources. These findings suggest that existing guidelines that recommend CABG for diabetic patients with multivessel CAD remain appropriate in current practice and may provide additional support for strengthening those recommendations.”

“With great concerns about escalating healthcare costs, it’s very important when setting policy to understand the benefits gained from additional expenditures over the long run,” said Magnuson, in an AHA press release. “This is especially true in cardiovascular disease where many interventions tend to be very costly up front.”

 

New Guidelines Define State-of-the-Art STEMI Care Reply

New guidelines published online today in Circulation and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology provide an efficient overview of the best treatments for STEMI patients. (Click here to download the PDFs of the full version (64 pages) or the executive summary  (27 pages) of the 2013 ACCF/AHA Guideline for the Management of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction.)

“We’re looking to a future where more patients survive with less heart damage and function well for years thereafter,” said Patrick O’Gara, the chair of the guidelines writing committee, in a press release. “We hope the guidelines will clarify best practices for healthcare providers across the continuum of care of STEMI patients.”

The new document strongly supports the establishment and maintenance of regional systems to treat STEMI, which should include assessment and continuous quality improvement programs.

Primary PCI remains the preferred method of reperfusion when it can be performed by experienced operators in a timely fashion. For people who can’t receive primary PCI within 120 minutes of arrival, fibrinolytic therapy should be given within 12 hours of the the onset of symptoms.

The first medical contact (FMC)-to-device time should be 90 minutes at PCI-capable hospitals. Patients who arrive at non PCI-capable hospitals should be transported to a PCI-capable hospital within 30 minutes and should be treated with a FMC-to-device system goal of 120 minutes of less.

Drug-eluting stents should not be used in patients who can’t or won’t comply with long-term dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). After receiving a stent patients should receive DAPT with aspirin and either clopidogrel, prasugrel, or ticagrelor.

Click here to read the AHA press release…