Precision Medicine Approaches Peak Hype Reply

No, Personalized Medicine Isn’t Going To Save $600 Billion Over 50 Years By Preventing Heart Disease

The hype over personalized medicine has now reached astonishing new heights.  In an article published in the Lancet, Victor Dzau, the new president of the Institute of Medicine, and coauthors write that personalized and precision medicine (PPM) could deliver hundreds of billions of dollars worth of improved health in the US over the next 50 years.

They used a health simulation model to estimate the effect of improved screening and risk prediction to treat people at high risk for 6 diseases: cancer, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, lung disease, and stroke. They then calculated the resulting gains in life expectancy and quality-adjusted life expectancy.

They calculated that reducing heart disease by 50% “would generate a staggering $607 billion in improved health over 50 years.”

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Victor Dzau

Victor Dzau

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Becoming Your Own Doctor In The Brave New World Of Personalized Medicine Reply

Lately there’s been a lot of talk about personalized medicine. There’s a bold idea going around that people should take control of their own healthcare and manage the flood of new data stemming from a whole bunch of new technologies, including, but hardly limited to, personal genomes, biomarkers, wireless sensors, and iPhone ECGs.

…boutique-style healthcare is a lot like organic food, which may taste better and may help a few privileged people feel better about themselves, and may possibly yield a small individual health benefit (though there is absolutely no evidence to show this). However, there is absolutely no chance that organic food can be used to actually feed the vast majority of the 7 billion or so people currently living on this planet.

Similarly, taking control of individual health data will almost certainly allow a few privileged and obsessed people to feel they’re better off than most. It may even improve their health. But, again, more importantly, there is no possibility in the foreseeable future that this self-management of extremely complex personal health data will improve the overall public health of the planet.

Read my entire post on Forbes.