The Uncertain Future Of A Once Highly Promising Device For Lowering Blood Pressure Reply

Following the spectacular crash and burn of the Symplicity HTN-3 trial at the American College of Cardiology two weeks ago, the future of renal denervation (RDN)– the once highly promising catheter technology that many thought would cure resistant hypertension– appears in doubt.

Although the device has not been approved in the US– and will not be approved without further clinical trials– in Europe and other places it remains on the market. So the questions about the technology’s future revolve around the future direction of research in the field and how the existing renal denervation market will be affected by the trial results.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

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Renal Denervation: Delineating Its Uses, Misuses, and Possibilities Reply

Over on CardioExchange, Murray Essler, the chief investigator of the  Symplicity HTN-2 trial, answers questions from John Ryan about renal denervation:

Non-pharmacologic antihypertensive measures must remain the starting point for patients with hypertension, but will often not be enough. Renal denervation should be reserved for patients in whom behavior modification combined with adequate and skillful antihypertensive drug prescribing cannot achieve BP reduction to target. There are no clinical trial data to support renal denervation in hypertension outside of this setting. In countries where the “genie is out of the bottle”, and clinical use is authorized, prevention of overuse will be difficult. In some instances government regulations will confine the use of renal denervation to drug-resistant hypertension. Insurer or governmental reimbursement rules should be framed to prevent overuse.

Click here to read the entire CardioExchange interview.