New Questions Raised About SPRINT

More questions are being raised about SPRINT, the enormous NIH-funded blood pressure lowering trial. Two recent developments will likely add more obstacles to the already difficult task of applying the results of the trial in the real world. Even before the full results of the trial were first made public the NIH and the SPRINT…

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SPRINTing to Lower BP Targets? Not So Fast

–Hypertension experts disagree about how to apply SPRINT results in the real world.  Once again blood pressure experts are disagreeing about how to interpret SPRINT and how its results should be applied in the real world. A new study claims that applying the SPRINT results to US patients who meet SPRINT criteria would prevent more…

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SPRINT: More Controversy And Confusion About ‘Landmark’ Trial

–Blood pressure experts raise new questions and concerns about the controversial trial. More questions and concerns are being raised about SPRINT, the NIH’s “landmark” blood pressure lowering trial. In sharp contrast to the enormous amount of initial hype, many hypertension experts are now saying that the SPRINT trial is difficult to interpret and can’t be readily…

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Cardiologists: Thumbs Down To SPRINT

[Updated, August 29, August 30] –SPRINT should not be used in guidelines to lower blood pressure targets. Should the SPRINT trial be used by guideline committees to lower systolic blood pressure targets? After listening to a high-powered debate at the European Society of Cardiology meeting in Rome on Sunday, most audience members gave thumbs down…

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How Does HOPE-3 Change Thinking About Primary Prevention?

–The study lends strong support for statins but delivers a mixed message for antihypertensives. The widely reported results of HOPE-3 may bolster the case for primary prevention with statins and blood pressure drugs. But the trial also makes clear that the benefits, though real, are also modest, and may not be evenly distributed between statins…

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Slow Down. Don’t Sprint To More Aggressive BP Treatment

Two editorialists in Annals of Internal Medicine urge caution in interpreting and adopting the findings of the SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial), which last year  showed a benefit for a more aggressive approach to blood pressure therapy. The trial found improved outcomes in  high risk patients treated to a target of of 120 mm…

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Meta-Analysis Gives More Support To Aggressive Blood Pressure Treatment

A large new meta-analysis offers fresh support to the growing movement in favor of more aggressive treatment to lower high blood pressure. The findings are consistent with and extend the results of the recently reported NIH SPRINT trial, which found substantial clinical benefits for a systolic blood pressure target of 120 mm Hg instead of 140…

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SPRINT Will Change But Not Revolutionize Blood Pressure Treatment

After all the hype and hoopla it turns out that the SPRINT trial  will in all likelihood really have a significant impact on clinical practice and future guidelines, but it also also seems clear that it will not bring about a revolution, as some have recently speculated, in the treatment of high blood pressure. That’s the broad  consensus emerging from hypertension…

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Lancet Sprints To The Front With A Blood Pressure Meta-Analysis

A new meta-analysis published in the Lancet on Friday lends fresh support to calls for more intensive blood pressure treatments. The publication comes only days before the highly anticipated presentation of the NIH’s SPRINT trial at the American Heart Association, which is also expected to offer support for stricter blood pressure control. Blood pressure goals were relaxed after the ACCORD…

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You Don’t Know It But The Debate About SPRINT Is Already Over

On Monday you’re going to hear a lot– an awful lot– about SPRINT. That’s the big NIH blood pressure trial which was stopped early. On September 11 an NIH press release trumpeted the positive results without revealing most of the important details. This Monday, finally, the results are scheduled to be presented at the American Heart…

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Coming Attraction: Looking Forward To SPRINT At The AHA Next Month

Back in September the NIH tantalized the medical community with a preliminary announcement of the results of a major clinical trial, SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial). The NIH said SPRINT was a “landmark trial” that could “save lives,” but their claims were impossible to evaluate since they only gave the slightest hint of the actual results. On November…

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Heart Failure Experts SPRINT To An Early Finish

According to a recent news report a group of prominent heart failure doctors  have eagerly embraced a lower blood pressure target of 120 mm Hg for heart failure patients based on the preliminary results of the SPRINT trial announced last month. But another equally prominent heart failure doctor says that it is far too early to…

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SPRINT Trial To Be Presented At The American Heart Association Meeting In November

Update: I have now received confirmation that SPRINT will be presented on Monday, November 9 at 2 PM. The SPRINT trial, which provoked a storm of excitement and controversy a few weeks ago, will be presented in November at the American Heart Association meeting in Orlando. The trial is not currently on the list of late-breaking clinical trials but…

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A Premature SPRINT To The Finish Line

On Friday the NHLBI declared victory in the SPRINT trial. As was widely reported here and elsewhere, the NHLBI announced that the trial had been stopped early after significant reductions in cardiovascular events and mortality had occurred in the group of hypertensive patients randomized to a  more aggressive blood pressure target than is currently recommended today. But there was a…

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NIH Trial, Stopped Early, Supports More Intensive Blood Pressure Targets

More stringent blood pressure targets could save lives and reduce cardiovascular events, according to preliminary results from a large NIH clinical trial that was stopped early. The SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) trial randomized 9,361 hypertensive patients 50 years of age or older to the standard systolic blood pressure target (when the trial began) of 140…

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