More Questions Raised About Boehringer Ingelheim’s Pradaxa 1

Once again dabigatran (Pradaxa) has raised the wrath of the critics. Several articles and an editorial published today in The BMJ raise more questions and concerns about the drug, which is the first of the new oral anticoagulants. Relying on new evidence along with previously disclosed data, Deborah Cohen, the  investigations editor for The BMJ, casts doubt on the reliability of the data supporting the drug as well as the behavior and decisions of regulatory authorities, trial investigators, and employees  of Boehringer Ingelheim, the drug’s manufacturer.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Yet Another Delay For Boston Scientific’s Watchman Device Reply

Boston Scientific hopes the third time will be the charm. The company disclosed on Tuesday yet another obstacle in the path to approval for its novel Watchman left atrial appendage closure device for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. Although it has already been before two FDA advisory panels, the company said that it had been informed by the FDA that it will need to undergo yet another advisory panel before gaining approval.

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

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Warfarin Benefits Extended To Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Reply

Anticoagulation is a cornerstone of therapy for atrial fibrillation because it lowers the heightened risk for stroke in this population. People with chronic kidney disease are also at increased risk for stroke, but the benefits of anticoagulation are less clear in this group, and anticoagulation is used less often in AF patients who have CKD. Now, a large observational study offers some reassurance that anticoagulation in AF patients with CKD may be beneficial.

Researchers in Sweden analyzed data from more than 24,000 survivors of acute myocardial infarction who had AF….

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

New Anticoagulant From Daiichi Sankyo Works Well In AF Patients Reply

Edoxaban, a direct oral factor Xa inhibitor under development by Daiichi Sankyo, is the latest in the series of new oral anticoagulants seeking to take over the troubled role of warfarin in clinical practice. The results of ENGAGE-AF-TIMI 48 were presented at the American Heart Association meeting in Dallas and published simultaneously in the New England Journal of Medicine. The results of the trial were promising, but edoxaban may have a hard time finding its footing as the fourth new oral anticoagulant to enter the market, following dabigatran (Pradaxa), Boehringer Ingelheim; rivaroxaban (Xarelto), Johnson & Johnson; and apixaban (Eliquis), Pfizer and Bristol-Myers Squibb.

In the trial, more than 21,000 patients with moderate-to-high-risk AF were randomized to one of two regimens of edoxaban or warfarin. Both high-dose and low-dose edoxaban were found to be noninferior to warfarin for the primary endpoint of stroke or systemic embolism. Here are the on-treatment annual rates of stroke or systemic embolism:

Click here to read the full post on Forbes.

 

Growing Popularity Of Dabigatran Leads To Increased Complications 1

Since its approval in the United States in October 2010 dabigatran (Pradaxa) has been prescribed 3.2 million times to more than 600,000 patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF), according to its manufacturer, Boehringer Ingelheim. The company also announced that, based on the pivotal RE-LY trial, the “Clinical Studies” section of the drug’s prescribing information now includes the statement that 150 mg twice daily of dabigatran “was superior in reducing ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes relative to warfarin.”

But the news about dabigatran is not entirely upbeat. According to new data compiled by QuarterWatch (PDF), in 2011 the FDA received more safety reports about dabigatran than any other drug. The data are not entirely unexpected, since the bleeding complications of dabigatran are well known and physicians are more likely to report adverse events associated with new drugs. The drug that dabigatran was designed to replace, warfarin (Coumadin), was the second most reported drug, and has been high on the FDA list for many years.

Dabigatran was the subject of  3,781 serious adverse events reported to the FDA in 2011. This included 542 patient deaths and 2,367 hemorrhages. Warfarin  was the subject of  1,106 serious adverse events, including 72 deaths.

QuarterWatch noted that the difference between the two anticoagulants “could be at least partly explained by differences in the reporting rate for an older generic drug with many manufacturers, and a newly launched brand name drug being promoted by a large sales force.” But, according to QuarterWatch:

“What is clear, however, is that the FDA’s system is receiving a strong signal about this safety issue. A large share of dabigatran reports (79%) come from health professionals, suggesting that despite this well-known drug risk the bleeding was unexpected or unusually severe.”

QuarterWatch notes that the rapid uptake of dabigatran is probably due to its ease of use– no frequent INR tests are required– and the lack of drug interactions. One likely source of complications is the use of the standard 150 mg dose in older patients or those with renal dysfunction. The label now recommends that physicians “assess renal function during therapy as clinically indicated” but QuarterWatch wonders “whether this modest language will lead to safer use.”
Click here to read the Boehringer press release…

2011 in Review: Rivaroxaban, Sapien, Mark Midei, Conflicts of Interest, and Much More 4

Here’s a completely personal review of the past year in cardiology. Please write a comment if you strongly agree, disagree, or think something is missing.

Drug of the Year: Rivaroxaban (Xarelto)– Despite a highly negative review from FDA reviewers, rivaroxaban gained FDA approval for the coveted stroke prevention in AF indication. The drug was approved earlier in the year for VTE prevention after surgery. The biggest surprise, though, was rivaroxaban’s success in ACS in the ATLAS ACS TIMI 51 trial, which may well have an important impact on the field for years to come.

Device of the Year: Sapien Transcatheter Heart Valve– TAVI entered the marketplace this year. It will take another few years before its full impact is completely understood.

Click to continue reading…